• The Antidote to Post-humanism Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    Are you ready for the posthuman future? We are living in an age of radical transformations in science, technology, and worldview. Standing at the center of the worldview now dominant in our society is an affirmation that human beings have the right, if not the responsibility, to “improve” themselves in every way. In a culture that celebrates youth, attractiveness, and achievement, the idea of personal improvement is now being stretched beyond what previous generations could have imagined. “It is a natural human desire to manipulate our bodies to look better, feel better, and age better,” ethicist Wesley Smith explains. “We … View Resource

  • Preserving the Godly Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    The older I get the more I become a news “junkie.” Some of my friends like to tease me because if they call or visit and I am watching television, it is invariably a cable news network of some kind. I have always been interested in what is going on in society, and in this way I can know what is happening 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. As I watch these programs, I often think about how much American culture has changed in the past ten years. Now by no means do I want to imply that … View Resource

  • Committed Surrender Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2005

    Therefore, let those who suffer according to God’s will entrust their souls to a faithful Creator” (1 Peter 4:19). Whatever happened to dating? I first noticed a decline in dating when our daughter, Jamie, was in high school. She told me she was just going out with friends. Going out with friends turned into “hanging out” with friends. Evidently dating was “out” and hanging out was “in.” If I understood the cultural vernacular, hanging out meant less of a commitment. The way Jamie and her friends used the word I got the idea that “dating” was one step short of … View Resource

  • Ordained by God Article by Douglas Kelly

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2004

    In the 1950s, a very popular song proclaimed “He’s got the whole world in his hands!” Insofar as it had any theological content, it presumably spoke of the beneficent control by the Lord of all that He has made. That is not too far from the meaning of “common grace.” That is to say, in spite of the world’s sin and God’s just judgment upon it, the mighty Creator-Redeemer has never abandoned His creation; He always keeps His hand upon it so that it will be sustained, pardoned, and renewed in order to fulfill its purpose to bring Him eternal … View Resource

  • Beacon of Holiness Article by Alistair Begg

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    If the Word does not dwell with power in us,” wrote Puritan John Owen, “it will not pass with power from us” (The Works of John Owen, vol. 16, p. 76.). This godly minister personified this truth in his personal life and public ministry more than three centuries ago. For years he carried the message of Jesus Christ into the trenches of a culture as chaotic as our own while simultaneously dealing with the death of his wife and all eleven of his children. John Owen was no ivory tower theologian, but rather a zealous pastor who worked … View Resource

  • The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    The Edict of Milan in A.D. 313 legalized Christianity. Toleration of this new faith in Rome was not a gradual development. It happened suddenly, right after some of the most brutal persecutions of Christians. Soon, Roman officials were kissing the broken hands of Christian confessors whom they had tortured. Quickly, paganism faded as the official religion of the Roman Empire, only to be replaced by the Christian church. Christianity, once despised and persecuted, emerged from the catacombs in triumph. Whereupon its problems really began. Constantine The emperor Diocletian, who initiated the most violent and systematic persecutions of Christians, ruled as … View Resource

  • Objective Cultural Norms Article by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2004

    For Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), the principle of “all things to all men” was not a moral warrant for upholding cultural relativism. Instead, it was a practical mandate for upholding cultural norms. It was for him an inducement to communicate more effectively the universal and objective principles of truth rather than justification to abandon them to subjective fashions and fancies. As a result, his life and work were monuments to the vitality of enduring and unchanging virtue. Scott was far and away the most popular writer and poet of the nineteenth century — outselling Austen, Dickens, Tennyson, Byron, Thackeray, and … View Resource

  • Don’t Look Back Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2004

    Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. I’ll admit I got taken in the first time. As a grade school child my conception of cool included too tight silk shirts and blue jeans with more flair than Liberace. I even had my own polyester jumpsuit. I looked like a cross between Howdy Doody and Elvis, in his latter years. The current fashion craze of recreating the nightmare of the seventies hasn’t filled my heart with a warm dose of nostalgia. Instead it makes me embarrassed for what I used to wear. I’ve learned my lesson … View Resource

  • The Making of Many Bibles Article by Ken Myers

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1995

    Martin Luther’s “outlaw” period, as he hid in the Wartburg castle masquerading as the mysterious “Squire George,” provided him a venue to fulfill a long-held desire: the translation of the New Testament into German. He believed (in the words of historian Owen Chadwick) that “the ploughman ought to be able to recite the Scripture while he was ploughing, or the weaver as he hummed to the music of his shuttle.” When completed in 1534, his translation of the Bible not only offered ploughmen and weavers access to inspired texts, it served as a means of social unity throughout what was … View Resource

  • Church Growth—Weaknesses to Watch Article by Os Guinness

    FROM TABLETALK | February 1992

    Like many movements, the church-growth movement is a grand mixture of things good, bad, and in-between. After stressing its significance last month, I will not comment further on its good parts—except to say that anything that “goes without saying” is in danger of being left unsaid. The best of the church-growth movement deserves better than that.Our present concern, however, is not the good but rather the bad and the in-between. For if the movement has a threefold positive significance, it also has a threefold weakness.First, the church-growth movement has two common deficiencies. On the one hand, its theological … View Resource