• Anti-Shepherds Article by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Our Dear Asag, Remember: our abysmal sublimity does not so much want to tear down “godly” ways as to build up his own. From the apex of temptation in the garden to the present, his conspiratorial plot has always been to offer some sane, attractive, and wholesome counterfeit to the true kingdom of our foe. That’s why subtle counterfeits are the perfect tools for your task to hamper shepherds from shepherding, to deter pastors from actually pastoring. Amorality is obvious and shortsighted; scandal lasts but for a season; but fiddling the days and hours away on sweet nothings can become … View Resource

  • Anxiety Article by Chris Larson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dearest Oriax, What?! You’re worried because your subject is worried? You seem to think that his fretful concern and persistent questioning will lead him to find answers with the enemy. Let us reassure you that such is rarely the outcome. The more these humans wallow in gnawing uncertainty and narrow-mindedness, the more they will come to resemble our cowering condition instead of patient confidence in the enemy’s will. They call it “anxiety,” and you would think it’s a virtue they cultivate as often as possible. Lest they repent and grow closer to the enemy, do not let them understand anxiety … View Resource

  • The Chronicles of Narnia Article by Leland Ryken

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    The most important lessons that we can learn from C.S. Lewis’ Narnian Chronicles are the ones that Lewis himself wanted us to learn. It so happens that Lewis said enough about literature in general and the Narnian books in particular that it is possible to read Lewis’ classic children’s stories with the author himself. One of the most important pieces of advice that Lewis gave to readers of literature is that they must receive a work of literature instead of using it. Lewis wrote, “A work of…art can be either ‘received’ or ‘used’. When we ‘receive’ it we exert our … View Resource

  • Church Shopping Article by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dear Stolas, You ask in your letter about the key to undermining the church as quickly as possible. This is scarcely rocket science, but, as you ask, we will try to enlighten you. At the heart of Christianity is the body of Christ — the church. The church is to be marked by the mutual love, self-giving, and commitment of her members. After all, to borrow an image from the frightful Paul of Tarsus, what use is a body where the different parts are disconnected, or working against each other, or constantly being transplanted from one part to another? We’d … View Resource

  • Concupiscence Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Our Dear Temeluchus, We are very pleased with the success you have had appealing to this young man’s sexual appetite. Telling him that every other young man is viewing pornography was a good move, and ensuring that he turned down the offer to block particular internet sites was crucial. Having his friends mock the very idea of sexual purity as prudish and “puritan“ was a stroke of genius. And how did you manage to get a Christian counselor to say that experimentation would ensure a more balanced and healthy attitude toward sex? You are showing great promise, our young trainee. … View Resource

  • Cynicism Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dear Shadow Guide, The enemy may now lay claim to your quarry, but he is still of great value to our cause. Our adversary, whom he now calls Lord, is not a realist. Idealism is the weakness of His kingdom. This specific prey of yours has a proclivity toward our utilitarian skepticism. Shadow Guide, you are a proven specialist in manipulating the antagonist’s illegitimates to mistrust consistently His care and pledges. Do what you do best — lead him into the enlightened suspicion of the shadows. A beautiful cynicism usually overtakes all of our own who are forced to live … View Resource

  • Discontentment Article by Jared Wilson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dearest Murktooth, We are happy to charge you with the present task for your assigned patient. We are happy because it is a rather easy task, evidence of your still remedial aptitude for temptations, which is itself evidence of your patient’s lack of growth. Your stagnation is your success, then, as it is so often in the infernal arts. The task before you is this: stimulate discontent in your patient. This task is easy for not a few reasons, perhaps the chief of which is that you will have so much help from the sweet cacophony of messages from the … View Resource

  • Division Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Our Dear Volac, We have finished our review of your trainee evaluations. We congratulate you on your efficiency. Considering how many minions you have to supervise, it is quite a task to complete this much paperwork on top of your other responsibilities. We should also let you know that the director of Inhuman Resources was quite pleased to receive them on time. It appears that many of our trainees are enthusiastic about their task. They know that we are at war with the enemy, and that one of the most important strategies in any war is to divide and conquer. … View Resource

  • Divorcing Doctrine from Scripture Article by R. Scott Clark

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dear Pithius, Our dear boy, you quite misunderstand the problem. So long as Christians continue to understand the Book to contain truths, claims about the way things really are, about the enemy, about Him-who-ought-not-be-named, about His Paraclete, about humans as contracting with us, and about the resolution of all things — one shudders — we shall never succeed. It is, therefore, imperative that you convince them to reckon the Book as a guide to personal fulfillment and especially a way to exquisite, euphoric experience. That is our best product. You will, of course, recognize this approach. It worked the first … View Resource

  • False Humility Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dearest Uglúk, Delightful. Utterly delightful. You have made wonderful progress with your subject. Not only has he come to embody a humility most false, he has begun to run with a crowd that will do naught but reinforce it. You have done well convincing him, albeit subtly through the use of quasi-Christian spiritualists (some of our greatest allies), that it is “humility“ to disdain thinking for himself, and further, to regard everyone, even himself, as having got it wrong — whether it involves the non-essentials of that blasted Christian faith, such as apologetic methods, or its central tenets, such as … View Resource

  • God in the Dock: The Apologetics of C. S. Lewis Article by Roger Nicole

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    In modern English the words apology and apologize indicate regret because some statement or action was offensive and wrong. This is not the case for “apologetics” in theology, for that discipline is intended to manifest “a point of view is right.” It is intended for those who differ in order to win them over, or for those who agree in order to confirm them in the truth for which the apologist testifies. It is in this sense that C.S. Lewis is recognized as an “apologist,” for a number of his works are intended to manifest the adequacy of the Christian … View Resource

  • Hyper-Criticism Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Our Accusing Apprentice, We are encouraged at how discouraged you seem by your inability to get your subject to renounce her allegiance to the name that terrifies even us. Our joy, however, is not in your displeasure, even if your suffering chills our heart. No, your discouragement gladdens us, for we can now show you the right approach to make this woman a weapon against the kingdom that we oppose. Having watched her for many years, her life convinces us that she is no goat in sheep’s clothing, and we will never pry her loose from her commander’s hand. But … View Resource

  • Idolizing Theology Article by Mark Ross

    Dearest Valefar, Your recent report has been received, and we do note your concern that things might have taken a turn for the worse. Perhaps they have, but we would not worry too much that your target has developed an almost insatiable thirst for theology. We do not say this can be ignored, but at the same time, we would caution you against any panic. If properly managed, you may find that this actually works to our advantage, not the enemy’s. The battle for a man’s soul can be fought in many ways. Head on, forceful confrontation by tempting him … View Resource

  • The Inner Ring Article by Nicholas Batzig

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2011

    Standing before the student body of King’s College, University of London, in 1944, C.S. Lewis delivered one of his most profound speeches. Intent on calling his listeners to give serious consideration to the dangers of what he labeled “The Inner Ring,” Lewis explained that at every social level there are certain “inner rings” of fellowship. Upon discovering them, the individual’s desire to enter the ring may become the driving force of his or her life. In seeking admission, many forfeit the greater blessing of developing lifelong friendships outside the ring. Plus, the irony of the “inner ring” is that once … View Resource

  • The Key to C.S. Lewis Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    C.S. Lewis was not only a Christian apologist and lay theologian. He was also an unusually imaginative and creative novelist. And in his day job at Oxford and then Cambridge he was an astonishingly perceptive and influential literary scholar. At a time when the modernist literary establishment was obsessed with depressingly bleak realistic fiction, Lewis sent readers’ imaginations soaring in his Chronicles of Narnia. While the modernists were looking down their noses at popular genre fiction, Lewis was writing the provocative science fiction of his Space Trilogy. In his apologetic and theological writing, Lewis was surprising both non-believers and emotional … View Resource