• Not Protesting Evil Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dear Eligos, We tempters have a job that is both easy and difficult. Thanks to our fearless leader’s victory in the garden some time ago, human beings are ridiculously, even comically, susceptible to sinning. And yet, sin itself is so ugly, so grotesque, so repellent — if it is only seen clearly (no offense to any of our colleagues) — that humans cannot help but hate it. This means that when we tempt someone to do evil, we are under the humiliating necessity to portray it as something good. This requires creating a certain mindset. A human sees someone else, … View Resource

  • Racism Article by Thabiti Anyabwile

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Our Dear Gremory, Your charge recently awakened to the enemy and discovered so-called “new life,“ which we know to be a grotesque death. No doubt your patient already thinks of many old things as worn and unpalatable, and has discovered new, ribald activities like singing and praying to the enemy with others. The enemy poisons his mind with talk of unity. No doubt the subject believes he is “one of them.“ But there lurks in him something old, awaiting opportunity to take control. Become familiar with this old man, and you may seduce your subject to abandon the enemy’s “new … View Resource

  • A Relegated Gospel Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dear Wormtongue, Before we get to the primary reason for our letter, we want to begin by commending you for the most excellent job you’ve done in your well orchestrated effort to convince your patient to keep his faith an entirely private matter, all the while thinking he’s doing a nobly sufficient job of showing forth his faith by displaying that old, faded Christian bumper sticker on his car. What’s more, you’ve gone beyond the call of duty as you’ve managed to persuade him to keep his faith segmented to one realm of his life rather than allowing it to … View Resource

  • Resisting the Devil Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    The nineteenth century French poet Charles Baudelaire wrote that “the devil’s best trick is to persuade you that he doesn’t exist.” In the providence of God, the Devil has been quite successful in persuading his followers that he doesn’t exist. But we who are followers of the Lord Jesus Christ know all too well that he does, indeed, exist, as we wrestle daily against our enemy and the rulers, authorities, cosmic powers, and spiritual forces of evil (Eph. 6:12). Interestingly, and according to God’s sovereign plan, the god of this world has blinded the minds of unbelievers so that they … View Resource

  • Self-Centered Sermons Article by Sean Michael Lucas

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Our Son in the Unfaith, We see that you are making progress with your charge. We applaud you for that. The enemy has enough minions preaching His infernal Word faithfully; to see this one begin to totter and swerve from his task causes me great and unholy happiness. Might we suggest another avenue by which you might neutralize his effectiveness and so undo his ministry? Begin to work ever so subtly that he would become the focus of the sermon instead of God’s wretched Son. That sounds like a difficult task, we know. Believe us, our general-in-unbelief struggled to get … View Resource

  • God in the Dock: The Apologetics of C. S. Lewis Article by Roger Nicole

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    In modern English the words apology and apologize indicate regret because some statement or action was offensive and wrong. This is not the case for “apologetics” in theology, for that discipline is intended to manifest “a point of view is right.” It is intended for those who differ in order to win them over, or for those who agree in order to confirm them in the truth for which the apologist testifies. It is in this sense that C.S. Lewis is recognized as an “apologist,” for a number of his works are intended to manifest the adequacy of the Christian … View Resource

  • The Weight of Glory Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    C.S. Lewis emerged as a twentieth-century icon in the world of Christian literature. His prodigious work combining acute intellectual reasoning with unparalleled creative imagination made him a popular figure not only in the Christian world but in the secular world as well. The Chronicles of Narnia and The Space Trilogy, though rife with dramatic Christian symbolism, were devoured by those who had no interest in Christianity at all, but were enjoyed for the sheer force of the drama of the stories themselves. An expert in English literature, C.S. Lewis functioned also as a Christian intellectual. He had a passion to … View Resource

  • The Chronicles of Narnia Article by Leland Ryken

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    The most important lessons that we can learn from C.S. Lewis’ Narnian Chronicles are the ones that Lewis himself wanted us to learn. It so happens that Lewis said enough about literature in general and the Narnian books in particular that it is possible to read Lewis’ classic children’s stories with the author himself. One of the most important pieces of advice that Lewis gave to readers of literature is that they must receive a work of literature instead of using it. Lewis wrote, “A work of…art can be either ‘received’ or ‘used’. When we ‘receive’ it we exert our … View Resource

  • The Key to C.S. Lewis Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    C.S. Lewis was not only a Christian apologist and lay theologian. He was also an unusually imaginative and creative novelist. And in his day job at Oxford and then Cambridge he was an astonishingly perceptive and influential literary scholar. At a time when the modernist literary establishment was obsessed with depressingly bleak realistic fiction, Lewis sent readers’ imaginations soaring in his Chronicles of Narnia. While the modernists were looking down their noses at popular genre fiction, Lewis was writing the provocative science fiction of his Space Trilogy. In his apologetic and theological writing, Lewis was surprising both non-believers and emotional … View Resource