• Signature in the Cell Article by Keith Mathison

    In 1991, Phillip Johnson published Darwin on Trial. In 1996, Michael Behe published Darwin’s Black Box. In 1998, William Dembski published The Design Inference. While numerous other books on the subject have been published, these three books are considered landmark works in the discussion over intelligent design. Now there is a fourth. Stephen C. Meyer’s new book, Signature in the Cell, may be the most persuasive case for intelligent design yet published. The timing could not be better, since 2009 is the 200th anniversary of Darwin’s birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the … View Resource

  • The Christian and Science (Part 1) Article by R.C. Sproul

    What is the Christian’s role in the scientific enterprise? How do we as Christians live in a culture that has been shaped and influenced by the impact of scientific accomplishments? Lest we slip into critical attitudes toward science, we must remember that science began with a mandate God gave in creation. God commanded Adam and Eve to have dominion over the earth and to subdue it. There is a sense in which man was created to conquer the universe in which he lives. The scientific enterprise is a part of that task. At the same time, certain restrictions and … View Resource

  • The Christian and Science (Part 3) Article by R.C. Sproul

    (Continued from The Christian and Science pt. 2)  Christians Need Not Fear Scientific Inquiry There is a sense in which the Christian should be the most passionate scientist of all because he should be rigorously open to truth wherever it is found. He should not be afraid that a new discovery of something that is true will destroy his foundation for truth. If our foundation for truth is true, all other truth can only support it and enhance it. It can’t destroy it. Therefore, Christians ought not to be afraid of scientific inquiry. This does not mean that … View Resource

  • Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the LORD? (Part 2) Article by L. Michael Morales

    The paradise atop Eden’s mount is described in Genesis 2-3 as a well-watered Garden with an abundance of fruit trees, a place where humanity and animals lived in harmony. These physical blessings, however, were but tokens (and small ones at that) of the greater delight of their Source: the very life-giving Presence of God. After Adam and Eve’s sin, and consequent descent from the mountain of the LORD, the biblical narrative continues to deal with the dilemma: How shall we abide in the divine Presence — who shall ascend? Sadly, as the narrative continues we find a progressive movement away … View Resource

  • Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the LORD? (Part 1) Article by L. Michael Morales

    Once a soul has come to understand something of the unutterable majesty of the holiness of God, the question asked in Psalm 15 and 24 suddenly weighs upon the heart: “Who shall ascend the mountain of the LORD?” That is, who can draw near to this living God in worship? Who can climb their way to the summit of his dwelling place and gaze upon his beauty? Who, what’s more, could ever abide with God in his house? Ezekiel 28:13-14 describes the Garden of Eden as being upon “the holy mountain of God,” a landscape we may … View Resource

  • Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the LORD? (Part 3) Article by L. Michael Morales

    Worship — approaching the living God — is the central concern of Scripture, and a vital aspect of its narrative drama. Who may climb the summit of the LORD’s dwelling place to gaze upon his beauty? Against the backdrop of this prevailing question, the Tower of Babel episode in Genesis 11 is especially stark in its depiction of fallen humanity’s titanic pride. “Come,” they say, having journeyed from the east, “let us build ourselves a city, and a tower whose top reaches into the heavens” (v 4). The word translated “tower” is migdol in Hebrew, understood here as referring … View Resource

  • The Covenant Way Article by Susan Hunt

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2010

    Even to old age and gray hairs, O God, do not forsake me, until I proclaim your might to another generation” (Ps. 71:18). One of the things I feel an urgency to proclaim to our covenant sons and daughters is that “God created man in his own image … male and female he created them… . And God said to them, ‘Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it and have dominion’” (Gen. 1:27–28). View Resource

  • Paradise Lost Article by David VanDrunen

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2008

    In the second chapter of Hebrews, the author notes that God did not appoint angels, but human beings, to rule the world to come (v. 5), and he quotes Psalm 8 to prove it: “You made him for a little while lower than the angels; you have crowned him with glory and honor, putting everything in subjection under his feet” (Heb. 2:7–8). Then the inspired author makes a statement that is both obvious and profound: “At present, we do not yet see everything in subjection to him” (v. 8). This statement is obvious because everyone recognizes that we human … View Resource

  • Old Expectations Article by Iain Duguid

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2007

    When Jesus started his earthly ministry, he began by “proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom” (Matt. 4:23). Yet nowhere in the Gospels do we see Jesus giving a clear definition of the kingdom. The reason is simple: Jesus didn’t have to define what the kingdom meant, because his hearers were well-schooled in the Old Testament. The puzzle for them was trying to work out how the coming of Jesus fitted into their Old Testament expectations. That is why Jesus later said, “Therefore every scribe who has been trained for the kingdom of heaven is like a master of a … View Resource

  • Existence in God Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2006

    Recently I visited a member of our congregation who was in the hospital. After leaving his room, I stepped onto the elevator and noticed two women standing quietly at the back of the elevator. Each was carrying a bag that displayed a local Buddhist temple. Politely, I said to the woman standing closer to me: “Hello, I see the bag you’re holding with the Buddhist temple on it — are you a Buddhist?” With some hesitation in her voice, she responded, “Yes, I am.” Having received her affirmative response, I asked another question: “I have studied Buddhism and … View Resource

  • Creation Ex Nihilo Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2006 | Genesis 1

    No sentence is more pregnant with meaning than the opening one of the Bible: “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth” (Gen. 1:1). It tells us several things all at once, four of which are worth reflecting upon: First and foremost, it tells us that God is the ultimate Being. Before there was a universe, there was God. He exists independently of matter and sequence of time. God transcends space and time. He is not limited by spatial considerations (He is everywhere in His fullness continually). Nor is He locked into the present in any way … View Resource

  • In The Beginning Article by Richard Phillips

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2005

    The Bible opens by saying, “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.” The purpose of the creation account was not to answer twenty-first century scientific skeptics, but to teach the people of Israel about their God. The God who had delivered Israel in the exodus, who now revealed Himself through the pen of Moses, is the true God and Maker of everything that is. God is the source of all things; in the beginning He already is, and, by His Word, the very universe was made. In the Beginning Genesis chapter 1 reveals God’s agenda to … View Resource

  • The Reversal of the Curse Article by Vern Poythress

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2004

    God promises us “a new heaven and a new earth” (Rev. 21:1). Some people leap to the conclusion that God will simply throw the present creation onto the scrap heap, so to speak, and start over again from scratch. But this cannot be right. We ourselves are part of this present creation. And if we trust in Christ, we know that we will not end up on the scrap heap! In Romans 8:18–25 God shows us how to think about our future. We who belong to Christ are “sons of God” (vv. 14–15, 19). The Spirit of Christ … View Resource