• Covenant Article by Michael Horton

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    Anyone who is employed or has a mortgage, credit card, or car is familiar with contracts — and the “blessings” and “curses” that they impose. Not all legal agreements are the same, of course. A contract differs significantly from a last will and testament, which can make you a beneficiary of someone else’s estate. You benefit not by a “work-for-hire” arrangement or a payment program but by a gift. Similarly, there are different kinds of covenants in the Bible. Reformed theology has discerned in Scripture three overarching covenants. The covenant of redemption is the agreement of the Father, Son, and … View Resource

  • Time to (Re)Discover Hebrews Article by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    Of all the New Testament letters, Hebrews seems to be one many Christians find strange and alien. Here we enter the world of Melchizedek and Aaron, angels and Moses, sacrifices and priests. It all seems so Old Testament, so intricate, and even confusing. If so, it is time to (re)discover Hebrews. But how? View Resource

  • Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the LORD? (Part 2) Article by L. Michael Morales

    The paradise atop Eden’s mount is described in Genesis 2-3 as a well-watered Garden with an abundance of fruit trees, a place where humanity and animals lived in harmony. These physical blessings, however, were but tokens (and small ones at that) of the greater delight of their Source: the very life-giving Presence of God. After Adam and Eve’s sin, and consequent descent from the mountain of the LORD, the biblical narrative continues to deal with the dilemma: How shall we abide in the divine Presence — who shall ascend? Sadly, as the narrative continues we find a progressive movement away … View Resource

  • Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the LORD? (Part 1) Article by L. Michael Morales

    Once a soul has come to understand something of the unutterable majesty of the holiness of God, the question asked in Psalm 15 and 24 suddenly weighs upon the heart: “Who shall ascend the mountain of the LORD?” That is, who can draw near to this living God in worship? Who can climb their way to the summit of his dwelling place and gaze upon his beauty? Who, what’s more, could ever abide with God in his house? Ezekiel 28:13-14 describes the Garden of Eden as being upon “the holy mountain of God,” a landscape we may … View Resource

  • Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the LORD? (Part 3) Article by L. Michael Morales

    Worship — approaching the living God — is the central concern of Scripture, and a vital aspect of its narrative drama. Who may climb the summit of the LORD’s dwelling place to gaze upon his beauty? Against the backdrop of this prevailing question, the Tower of Babel episode in Genesis 11 is especially stark in its depiction of fallen humanity’s titanic pride. “Come,” they say, having journeyed from the east, “let us build ourselves a city, and a tower whose top reaches into the heavens” (v 4). The word translated “tower” is migdol in Hebrew, understood here as referring … View Resource

  • The Covenant Way Article by Susan Hunt

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2010

    Even to old age and gray hairs, O God, do not forsake me, until I proclaim your might to another generation” (Ps. 71:18). One of the things I feel an urgency to proclaim to our covenant sons and daughters is that “God created man in his own image … male and female he created them… . And God said to them, ‘Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it and have dominion’” (Gen. 1:27–28). View Resource

  • Our Only Mediator Article by Kim Riddlebarger

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2009

    Q. But who now is that Mediator, who in one person is true God and also a true and righteous man? A. Our Lord Jesus Christ, who is freely given unto us for complete redemption and righteousness. (Heidelberg Catechism, Q&A 18) Christians believe that the human race is fallen in Adam. It is not as though the human race is sick and faces imminent demise because of the effects that sin will have upon us if we do nothing about it; rather, Scripture teaches that we are already dead in sins and trespasses (Rom. 5:12–19; Eph. 2:1 … View Resource

  • Our Covenant Lord Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    I remember when I first started to study covenant theology while a student at a dispensationalist seminary in Texas. One thing that always puzzled me was the lack of any introductory level book explaining the basics of covenant theology. There were, of course, books that looked at the specific biblical covenants as well as books that examined this or that aspect of covenant theology, but at the time, I was unable to find a single work that put everything together and explained the basics in a way that someone new to covenant theology could understand. Today several such volumes are available … View Resource

  • Covenant Prosecutors Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    I don’t remember the exact words. They went something like this: “He was a thundering paradox of a man.” These words served as the opening lines of William Manchester’s classic biography of General Douglas MacArthur. In this work, MacArthur was shown as a multi-faceted man whose essence could not be crystallized by a single attribute. In like manner, the prophets of the Old Testament were men of multi-faceted and multi-dimensioned responsibilities and behavior. Some of the roles carried out by these prophets include the following: First, the prophets of Israel were agents of revelation. They did not say,   … View Resource

  • Family Religion Article by Melton Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2007

    I recently was privileged to speak at an ancient country church. It was a rural church, the kind with a fine graveyard, an old bell in the steeple, a formal “ladies parlor,” and a nice family in the fellowship hall making pecan pie for those gathered at midweek Bible study. When I arrived I was warmly greeted and soon had a good sense of the familial nature of this evangelical assembly. Clearly everyone was there because they were related to someone who had been there before. I was struck on that occasion by how the Bible is largely a collection … View Resource

  • A Mother in Israel Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2007

    Jacob, the wily one, after ten or fifteen years, finally returns to Bethel. God has been at work in his life, drawing the wayward patriarch to himself. It has been a difficult journey. It invariably is so when our wills are set at variance against the Lord’s. From the perspective of hindsight, Jacob could now speak to his family of a God “who answers me in the day of my distress and has been with me wherever I have gone” (Gen. 35:3). Jacob had been sheltered within the orbit of God’s covenant faithfulness. Despite half-hearted commitment and questionable decisions … View Resource

  • Those Whom God Hath Joined Together Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2006

    One of the great joys of serving as a pastor is performing weddings. Over the past few years, I have had the privilege of performing several wedding ceremonies, and on each occasion I have used the traditional wedding vows found in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer. Although many creative young couples these days are creating their own wedding vows, such creativity ceases when the young couple steps into my office. Through the months of premarital counseling and extensive discussions on the wedding itself as a covenant-making ceremony, I discuss with the couple the significance of their marriage vows and … View Resource

  • Covenant and Culture Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2006

    The word covenant is a theological term. But it is also a cultural term. It has to do with God’s primal design for how human beings, fallen though we be, can live together and form a society. Social philosophers and political theorists talk about the “social compact” or the “social contract.” The concept in its different nuances was developed by Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau, though it goes back to the ancient Greeks. It states that governments and, indeed, cultures entail a tacit but binding agreement between parties: I will obey your laws if you protect my rights. I will … View Resource

  • Covenant Community Article by David McKay

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2006

    When a pastor looks at his assembled congregation, what does he see? If he accepts a biblical covenant theology, he knows that he is not looking at a collection of randomly gathered individuals, or even families, but at a part of the covenant people of God. That perspective, when grasped by a congregation, ought to make a great impact on how these people view their life together. Covenant theology reminds the people of God that they are to think covenantally rather than individualistically. Such a mindset is the very opposite of that which shapes much of current Western thinking. The … View Resource

  • Redemptive History Article by Richard Phillips

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2006

    Even those casually familiar with the Bible know its basic contents: the Old Testament in front and the New Testament in back. Those more familiar know its contents more deeply. First is the Pentateuch (the five books of Moses), followed by the histories, the poetic books, and the prophets. In the New Testament, we find the Gospels, Acts, the Epistles, and Revelation. This describes how the church has organized the canon of the Bible’s books. But does Scripture present its own structure for understanding its message of salvation? As Reformed theologians have long observed, the Bible does provide such a … View Resource