• Comforting Eve Article by Eric Watkins

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2013

    There are countless places in the Bible that will comfort Christians in their trials or encourage them in their obedience through reflection on the things that are to come. Perhaps it is too common (and unhelpful) to reduce these things, the study of which is called eschatology, to “that hard-to-understand stuff at the end of the Bible.” Rather, I would like to suggest that eschatology is not simply that with which the Bible ends; it is also that with which the Bible begins, and that knowing our eschatology is extremely comforting. Let us begin with Eve. Among the women we … View Resource

  • What Is Your Only Comfort? Article by Kim Riddlebarger

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    Of all the Reformation-era catechisms, perhaps none is as well-loved as the Heidelberg Catechism. In the opening question and answer, the personal and distinctive tone of the catechism becomes evident. “What is your only comfort in life and in death?” This is not a theoretical question—“What would be necessary if God were to comfort sinners?” Rather, this is a very practical question—“How do I have comfort as long as I live and then when I die?” The key word in the opening question is comfort (German, trost). The word refers to our assurance and confidence in the finished … View Resource

  • An Infallible Map Article by Kevin Struyk

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    I enjoy looking at maps. Not only are they helpful tools to navigate unfamiliar territory, they also provide a unique “big-picture” view from an omniscient vantage point. Do you ever wish there was a map available to show where your life was going? I do. Will my life be like traveling on a curvy road on the edge of a high mountain with no guardrail? Will it be like cruising a straight highway through the plains of Iowa? Will it be a scenic route? Will I ever run into a dead end?  The future is unknown to us. Tomorrow your … View Resource

  • Our Comforter in Life and Death Article by Larry Edison

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2004

    In one form or another, I have heard cries of the heart many times over the years. People hurt deeply. We live in a world where, for believer and unbeliever alike, there is pain, heartache, and the experience of tragedy. It is all so very confusing for us as Christians. “Where is God when I hurt so bad?” “I feel so alone — ultimately I am the only one who can face this illness. Sure, I am glad that my husband and children are close, but I am the one who is sick, and I know I will have … View Resource