• Eschatology Guy Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2012

    My first two books were on the subjects of dispensationalism and postmillennialism, respectively. I was thrilled, then, when asked to write my third book on the doctrine of sola Scriptura and a fourth book on the doctrine of the Lord’s Supper. You see, I didn’t want to become an “eschatology guy.” What in the world, you ask, is an “eschatology guy”? And why wouldn’t I want to be one? Is it some kind of super-villain? In order to understand this fear I had, you have to understand a little bit about the dispensational circles I had recently left. I … View Resource

  • The Discipline of Learning Article by Donald Whitney

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    The Christian life begins with learning — learning the gospel. No one is made right with a God about whom He knows nothing. No one is made right with God unless he learns about Him and His message to the world, a message of good news called the gospel. To know God, people must learn that there is a God (Heb. 11:6), that they have broken His law, and that they need to be reconciled to Him. They must learn that God’s Son, Jesus, came to accomplish that reconciliation and that He did so by means of His sinless … View Resource

  • Amen Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    And all the people said … “Amen!” The “amen corner” has had an important place in the life of the church throughout the ages. However, it is rare to find such a spot among Presbyterians. We are known as God’s frozen chosen for a reason. It has been said that the Methodists like to shout “Fire,” the Baptists like to shout “Water,” and the Presbyterians like to softly say, “Order, order.” Nevertheless, in spite of the idiosyncrasies of various ecclesiastical persuasions, the function of the word amen far transcends denominational usages in the modern era. The term amen was used … View Resource

  • Blessing Article by John Tweeddale

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    The Bible is a blessed book. It begins with blessing. It ends with blessing. It’s about blessing. Even more, it is a blessing. But all of this begs a question: what exactly do we mean by the word blessing? Count Your Blessings In everyday parlance, the word blessing reflects a range of meanings. We can count them one by one. So, for example, we might speak of bumping into a long-lost friend as an “unexpected blessing” or (depending on the friend) even as a “mixed blessing.” Here the word more or less conveys the idea of personal gain and good … View Resource

  • Church Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    In the language of the Westminster Confession of Faith, the church comprises the “whole number of the elect, that have been, are, or shall be, gathered into one, under Christ the Head thereof” (25.1). This is otherwise known as the invisible church. In another sense, the church is the body of the faithful (1 Cor. 12:27; Eph. 2:21–22; Rev. 21:2, 9), consisting of those throughout the world who outwardly profess faith, together with their children (WCF 25.2). This is otherwise known as the visible church. The Greek word that is translated as “church” in the … View Resource

  • God’s Hammer Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    Sometimes, indeed often, we build and maintain our paradigms for our own comfort. Our worldviews are usually less the result of careful, dispassionate, sober-minded analysis and more the result of self-serving, special pleading, rationalization of our sin. We believe not because these beliefs commend themselves to our minds but because in our minds the beliefs commend us. It is these habits of our desperately deceitful hearts that make us miss the voice of God. He speaks, but we hear what we want to. We come to our Bibles with this most fundamental presupposition—whatever the Bible may be saying, it can’t … View Resource

  • In Defense of Words Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    What is a pastor? I was asked this question not too long ago by a teenage girl who apparently didn’t know the meaning of the word pastor and was curious to learn. I must admit that I was somewhat shocked and quite saddened that she didn’t know what a pastor is, but I quickly sought to offer her an explanation of the word and how I serve as a pastor of God’s people by preaching, teaching, praying, evangelizing, discipling, counseling, and so on. And just as these words were coming out of my mouth, I realized that if she didn’t … View Resource

  • Problematic Analogies and Prayerful Adoration Article by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    Ask any children’s Sunday school teacher what the most difficult thing to teach is and he will almost certainly tell you: “The doctrine of the Trinity, that God is one but exists in three persons.” Ask them how they do it and you will probably find them outlining an analogy: “God is like water, ice, and steam” is one of the more popular. The problem with such an analogy — indeed, with any analogy — for the Trinity is that it is actually more misleading than helpful. What it describes is not really something akin to the biblical Trinity … View Resource

  • The Gospel & Journaling Article by Donald Whitney

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2011

    Many of the godliest, most influential Christians in the history of the church have made it a practice to keep a spiritual journal. Also known in older writings as a “diary,” a journal is a document where people record information that relates to their spiritual lives and reflect on it. The content may range from meditations on Scripture to musings on an event in life and how it relates to Scripture. So, on a given day, one might write his or her thoughts regarding Romans 8:28. Alternatively, he or she might describe something that occurred and ask, “Why … View Resource

  • From Geneva to Nashville Article by Luder Whitlock Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1995

    The last Reformed study Bible, with explanatory comments in the margins or at the bottom of the page, was the Geneva Bible, a product of the Reformation. As Dr. Nicole has shown, it was produced by John Knox and others influenced by Calvin at Geneva and became the Bible of the Puritans. Its influence was widespread and profound; its legacy enduring. Eventually it fell from use, supplanted by the King James Version. For years there has been a recognized need for a new Reformed study Bible to replace the role filled earlier by the Geneva Bible. Since my seminary days … View Resource