• For Glory and Beauty Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2012

    The week before Christmas, when I was in third grade, my grandmother took me to downtown Pittsburgh so that I could buy gifts for my family and, for the first time in my life, my girlfriend. I wanted to buy something romantic for her, so I selected a small decorative pin. It looked to me as if it was made of gold, but it really wasn’t. However, I was able to have her initials engraved on the pin, and the lady behind the counter gift-wrapped it for me. It made a nice gift, and when I gave it to my … View Resource

  • The Beautiful Tears Article by Makoto Fujimura

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2010 | John 11

    In John 11, Jesus weeps. His tears, shed in response to Lazarus’ death and Mary and Martha’s grief, are full of embodied truth, beauty, and goodness. Why did Jesus weep? He delayed coming to Bethany “so that the Son of God may be glorified through it” (John 11:4), and, when He arrived, informed Martha that He is “the resurrection and the life” (v. 25). If He came to Bethany to show His power, the fact that He is indeed the Messiah with the power to resurrect the dead, why did He not simply wave His “magic wand” to “solve the … View Resource

  • Building with Conviction Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2010

    Wherever people come together to worship God, whether it be on a desert island or in a burgeoning metropolis, whether it be on the plains of Africa or in the cold winter of Siberia, people are concerned to worship Him in terms of the good, the true, and the beautiful. In the book of Exodus, we see the origin of the tabernacle, which was the house of God. This was the house where people came to meet with the living God. In order to prepare that house, the Lord gave meticulous instructions, down to the finest details, as to how … View Resource

  • A Conspiracy of Goodness Article by William Edgar

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2010

    There is a small village in the center of France with a unique history. In the midst of World War II, the country was partly occupied and partly “free,” meaning the French government, headquartered at Vichy, led by Maréchal Pétain, cooperated with the Germans, who in turn granted a certain measure of liberty to its citizens. Everyone understood, however, that no true freedom existed in either of these zones. The Nazis bore down hard and had no intentions of allowing any sort of independence from the claims of the Third Reich. In this context, and particularly in France, Jews and … View Resource

  • Encountering Absolute Rest Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2010

    All human beings are made in the image of God, and all human beings know God created them, whether or not they want to admit it. We know that God created us with an insatiable desire for goodness, truth, and beauty. By nature we know we need these three things and that we need them absolutely. We do not yearn for partial goodness, truth, and beauty but for complete and absolute goodness, truth, and beauty. We strive after these three essential qualities because we can’t help but strive after them. Just as God has put eternity in our hearts (Eccl. … View Resource

  • Jerusalem and Athens Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2010

    What hath Jerusalem to do with Athens? Much in every way. On the negative side, we would do well to remember that the citizens of God’s city, like those in the city of man, are still sinners. Though we are indwelt by God’s Holy Spirit, though we have been given hearts of flesh, we remain sinners on this side of the veil, not unlike those around us. Thus Jesus, in His Sermon on the Mount, enjoins us not to do that which still comes all too naturally to us, to fret and worry about our food or our clothing. Such … View Resource

  • The Triune God: Good, Beautiful, and True Article by Harry Reeder

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2010

    The Word of God clearly challenges our attempt to relativize truth, beauty, and goodness, first by declaring the Word itself true, beautiful, and good, then by revealing these as attributes of the triune God. Truth is a reality because God is truth and cannot lie. Therefore, what God says does not contain truth or become truth — it is truth: “Sanctify them in the truth; your word is truth” (John 17:17). View Resource

  • Beauty & the Gospel Article by Terry Yount

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2010

    In the modern era, beauty is unavoidably tied to the simplistic concept of “prettiness,” like that found in greeting card poems or velvet paintings of lighthouses. In truth, beauty is far more. Beauty reveals the gamut of human experience. True beauty is an ally of the gospel in that it parallels the human dilemma. In reality, a rose is beautiful, but it also has thorns. View Resource

  • The Author of All Beauty Article by John Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2006

    Why do Christians need to be “recovering the beauty of the arts,” as R.C. explores in his series by the same name? Because beauty, like truth, belongs to the children of God, and we have lost our grasp of it and our effective use of it in our witness. I’ve often considered how helpful it would be, as I have stood in some of the great galleries of the world, if I could talk to the artists and ask questions about their work. Why did you paint this tree next to that river? Why did you use this … View Resource

  • Supernatural Beauty Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2005

    Do not let your adorning be external — the braiding of hair, the wearing of gold, or the putting on of clothing — but let your adorning be the hidden person of the heart with the imperishable beauty of a gentle and quiet spirit, which in God’s sight is very precious” (1 Peter 3:3–4). One evening, during a family gathering in our home, one of my daughter’s children was “into” the aggravation of a sibling. I called him down, and he turned and glared at me; it was the look of Cain. He gave me a dark, malicious stare … View Resource

  • The Law of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1989

    In giving a summary of what constitutes the true knowledge of God, we showed that we cannot form any just conception of the character of God, without feeling overawed by His majesty, and bound to do Him service. —John Calvin Yesterday, a man I met for the first time asked me, “And what is the Lord doing in your life?” (Something about how he asked the question, the tone of his voice, and his manner in it disturbed me.) The manner of asking was a bit too casual, as if the utterance was mechanical. I suppressed my annoyance and … View Resource