• A Passion for Truth Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    Truth is one of the most contested issues of our times. We now live in what Ralph Keyes has memorably named “the post-truth era.” Many intellectuals simply dismiss the idea of truth as a play on words and a claim to power. In the postmodern academy, truth is assumed to be unknowable or nonexistent — with nothing left but perspectives, prejudices, and opinions. For B.B. Warfield, truth was always the central issue. Even as the worlds of theology, biblical studies, and other academic disciplines were rejecting the very idea of revealed truth, Warfield represented a stalwart defense of … View Resource

  • Machen’s Warrior Fathers Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    There is no escaping that we serve a God of covenants. It is His habit to work through means. High on that list of means is faithful men with a vision that extends beyond their nose, men who purpose in terms of millennia, rather than forty days. Because we are in the throes of covenantal cursing, we do not know our fathers. We are historical orphans. Somewhere along the line, someone forgot to explain the ebeneazors, and now we are adrift. We don’t know who we are, nor where we came from. Even our recovery is an anemic one, as … View Resource

  • Equipping the Saints Article by Gary L. W. Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    Pulitzer Prize-winning author John Updike has captured the common perception of B.B. Warfield in his novel In The Beauty of the Lilies. One of his central characters is a Presbyterian minister Clarence Wilmot who finds his faith badly shaken by the famous agnostic Robert Ingersoll. Wilmot is portrayed as having studied under the legendary Princeton professor who is described as an imposing figure “erect as a Prussian general, with snowy burnsides.” A similar impression was actually made concerning J. Gresham Machen as recorded in Paul Woolley’s The Significance of J. Gresham Machen Today: “Even to an ignoramus, Warfield … View Resource

  • Fighting the Good Fight Article by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    Warfield’s world, once he arrived at Princeton in 1887, was not very large at all. His house, the Old Hodge House, conveniently situated him next to Alexander Hall, which contained Princeton Seminary’s dorm rooms and classrooms. Across the lawn stood Miller Chapel. His own well-stocked study — as editor of The Princeton Review he had a constant flow of books sent to him — could be supplemented by a short trip to the seminary’s library. Yet, Warfield’s impact belies this small world, stretching far beyond the tree-lined campus of Princeton. From the lectern he trained two generations of ministers, and with … View Resource

  • Guardian of the Word Article by Andrew Hoffecker

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    The founders of the first Presbyterian seminary in America wanted it to be synonymous with Reformed theology. They intended Princeton Seminary to produce pastors and scholars sound in doctrine, fervent in piety, and committed to defending traditional Calvinism. Benjamin B. Warfield, like his predecessors at old Princeton, reveled in the delights of Reformed theology. Eschewing theological innovation, Warfield continued the heritage bequeathed to him by Archibald Alexander, Charles Hodge, and A. A. Hodge of making a plethora of contributions across the theological disciplines. But his most enduring legacy lay in apologetics and specifically in defense of the authority, inspiration, and … View Resource

  • Servant and Scholar Article by Russell Pulliam

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield was a “classic.” His written works have stood the test of time and have inspired subsequent generations. His life also stands the test of time in the way he kept his priorities: to Christ, to his wife, and to his students at Princeton Theological Seminary. He was a prolific writer and, in terms of brilliance, a giant among the Princeton giants of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. To the frustration of later students of his work, he left no diaries or journals, which a review of his life will give some hints as to why. Before … View Resource

  • B.B. Warfield: Defender of the Faith Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    Twenty-five years ago I gave an address at a college in western Pennsylvania. After the service was completed, an elderly gentleman and his wife approached me and introduced themselves as Mr. and Mrs. Johannes Vos. I was surprised to learn that Dr. Vos was the son of the celebrated biblical theologian Geerhardus Vos who had written a classical work on redemptive history entitled Biblical Theology, which is still widely read in seminaries. During the course of my conversation with them, Dr. Vos related to me an experience he had as a young boy living in Princeton, New Jersey, where his … View Resource

  • In Word and Deed Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    We have all heard the saying: “Practice what you preach.” Early in my ministerial training, I became convinced of the importance of the truth that Christians, particularly preachers, should practice what they preach. After several years of working to ensure that I was practicing what I was preaching, I was confronted by a wise, old pastor who challenged me. He said that if I, as a minister, only practiced what I preached, then I could never faithfully serve the Lord in ministry. He explained that a minister is called to live a holy life before God and man, and … View Resource