• Contra Mundum Article by Ken Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    As illustrated in other articles in this issue, the fourth century was a very interesting time in the history of the church. Having undergone a great deal of persecution as a despised religion in the eyes of Rome, the conversion of Constantine and the Edict of Milan in 313 brought about a policy of toleration for Christianity. The external threats to the church having somewhat subsided, internal threats once again began to mount. Heresy was not new to the church. The apostle Paul took on the challenge of the Judaizers in the first century, and, among others, Irenaus refuted the … View Resource

  • Heresy and Those Who Fought It Article by Frank Farrell

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1994

    To murder the soul is worse than murdering the body, so the teaching of heresy should be punishable by death.” I have never forgotten this statement made to me 40 years ago by a monk in the Trappist monastery of Mount Melleray in the south of Ireland. Though I could not agree with the penalty, he had joltingly reminded me of the seriousness of heresy in a century which tends to take it very lightly. It has been said that the history of the church is the history of heresies. To forget or neglect them is to lay oneself open … View Resource