• The Promise of God’s Presence Article by John R. Sittema

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    Out of the blue, the old man heard the voice of God. This wasn’t one of the gods his people tried to placate in fear. This one talked. What did He want? The old man’s name was Abram, later changed to Abraham. The God who spoke was Yahweh—literally, “He who is.” Yahweh told him to leave Ur, which was near the Persian Gulf, and move to a small strip of land along the Mediterranean. God would be there, and Abraham would enjoy His presence. TO GLORIFY GOD AND ENJOY HIM The story is told in Genesis 12. Abraham … View Resource

  • Abraham’s Covenant Family Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009 | Galatians 3

    There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. And if you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s offspring, heirs according to promise” (Gal. 3:28–29). January 3, 1998, Tom Osborne, head coach of the University of Nebraska football team, announced his retirement. As a University of Tennessee fan, I was glad to see this noble adversary take his leave. The night before, his Cornhuskers had defeated the Tennessee Volunteers 42–17 in the Orange Bowl. In speaking about his age and stepping down … View Resource

  • The True Sons Article by Terry Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009 | Galatians 3

    Who are the true sons of George Washington? Every player in our political arena today attempts to legitimize his or her political agenda by an appeal to the Founding Fathers. American politicians must be able to show that they embody the principles first established by our Founders. Who best represents their concepts of justice? Of freedom? Of the “common good?” Of the separation of church and state? Conservatives, liberals, the American Communist Party, and even the American Nazi Party of the 1930s present or presented themselves as the true heirs of the Founding Fathers. You may have seen pictures of … View Resource

  • Dying Well Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2007

    Sarah lived 127 years…. And Sarah died…. And Abraham went in to mourn for Sarah and to weep for her” (Gen. 23:1–2). Sarah and Abraham had been married fifty-two years. He would live almost four decades without her (see Gen. 25:7). She was sixty-five when she married Abraham, who was ten years older (Gen. 12:4; see 17:17, where we learn that when he was 100, she was 90). Eleven years into their marriage, still childless, Abraham was eighty-six and took another wife, Hagar (Gen. 16:16). Fourteen years later, when Abraham was one hundred years old, Sarah … View Resource

  • Family Covenant Article by John Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2007 | Genesis 22

    What if you had an angel involved in the arrangement of your marriage or your children’s marriage, wouldn’t that be amazing? If you’re a believer, you actually do; the “Angel of the Lord” Himself. In Genesis 24, Abraham, in his advanced age, commissions his servant to find a suitable wife for Isaac, his son. Abraham’s desire is undergirded by God’s design. An angel accompanies Abraham’s servant as he seeks out and, ultimately, finds Rebekah. This kind of superintendence is not reserved for prophets; it is how God perpetuates His promises and His people. God … View Resource

  • He Has a Name Article by Greg Barolet

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2006

    We have been reading about the covenants these past few days, and it may prove helpful to look at a few chapters where God prepares Abram for His promise. The Greek and Hebrew verbs for covenant basically mean “to cut a covenant.” Covenants can be between fathers and sons, kings and subjects, and in our case, God and His people, or with an elected person like Abram. As a noun, covenant means “testament.” “This is the new testament in my blood,” or “this is the new covenant in my blood.” They are interchangeable. In this portion … View Resource

  • Decisions, Decisions Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2006

    Recently, I found myself in a discussion with my sister about some of the things we used to do when we were children. I have to admit that is always fun to reminisce about those days and consider all of the simple things that brought such joy to our hearts so long ago. We recalled with fondness the many games of baseball we used to play with the neighborhood kids in the schoolyard across the street from our house. She reminded me of those many nights my father took us all out to dinner because my mother was busy conducting … View Resource

  • Voices of Temptation Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2006

    The birth of Ishmael, son of Abram and Hagar, is a tale that in some sense at least should never have been. From it emerges a familial and ethnic strife that lasts to this very day. It is a tale of marital strife, of hobbling faith and catastrophic consequence. There is an interesting and devastating parallel in the way Moses recounts the tale of Adam’s fall in the garden of Eden and Abram’s lapse of faith in Genesis 16: both employ the phrase, they “listened to the voice of…” (Gen. 3:17; 16:2). And in both instances, the men … View Resource

  • Our Great Reward Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2006

    In June 2006 in this section we commented on the way in which the story of redemption focuses on Abraham’s “seed” as the line by which the Messiah will come to save God’s people from their sins (Gen. 12:7; 13:15–16). This is but an outworking of the promise made in Eden that the “seed” of the woman will triumph over the “seed” of the serpent (Gen. 3:15). This now emerges once more in Genesis 15 — the chapter that inaugurates God’s covenant with Abraham. Abraham (whose name at this point is still “Abram”) has been victorious in … View Resource

  • Father Abraham Had Many Sons Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2006

    With our daily studies just beginning to introduce that pagan family from Ur of the Chaldeans, we are also introduced to the one whom the God of creation called to start fixing the evil mess Adam and his children made. Through Abraham and his children and grand-children, God eventually sent His Son to fulfill finally and faithfully the vocation to which His ancestors were called. And Abraham was the one who left everything behind, walking by faith, even when he didn’t know where he was going (Heb. 11:8). For this, he was revered by the people of Israel as … View Resource