Right Now Counts Forever

For over forty years, Dr. R.C. Sproul wrote a recurring column in Tabletalk magazine titled Right Now Counts Forever. Each month, he applied the truth of Scripture to everyday life in order to help Christians understand the eternal significance of all that we think and do today. This resource collection features several of Dr. Sproul’s most beloved columns as well as other resources that expound upon this important theme.

  • Beauty and the Best Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2009

    There is a tension among the people of God that reflects a delicate balance to which the Bible calls us. Paul, you will recall, argued that in his passion for the gospel, he wished to be all things to all people, that by all means some might be saved (1 Cor. 9:22). On the other hand, Jesus tells the disciples that when they brought the good news and were not received, they were to wipe the dust off of their feet as they left the town (Luke 9:5). They’re both legitimate perspectives on the lost. Where, we wonder, does earnestly … View Resource

  • Cosmic Treason Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2008

    The sinfulness of sin” sounds like a vacuous redundancy that adds no information to the subject under discussion. However, the necessity of speaking of the sinfulness of sin has been thrust upon us by a culture and even a church that has diminished the significance of sin itself. Sin is communicated in our day in terms of making mistakes or of making poor choices. When I take an examination or a spelling test, if I make a mistake, I miss a particular word. It is one thing to make a mistake. It is another to look at my neighbor’s paper and … View Resource

  • Eternity Video Message by R.C. Sproul

    Right now truly does count forever, and the choices we make today have eternal consequences. In this message, Dr. R.C. Sproul reminds us not only of the importance of our present thoughts, words, and deeds, but also of the fact that all that happens today is part of God’s plan to make known His glory in history and leads ultimately to the revelation of His glory to His children into all eternity. View Resource

  • The Fine Points of Calvinism Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2005

    The late theologian Cornelius Van Til once made the observation that Calvinism is not to be identified with the so-called five points of Calvinism. Rather, Van Til concluded that the five points function as a pathway, or a bridge, to the entire structure of Reformed theology. Likewise, Charles Spurgeon argued that Calvinism is merely a nickname for biblical theology. These titans of the past understood that the essence of Reformed theology cannot be reduced to five particular points that arose as points of controversy centuries ago in Holland with the Remonstrants, who objected to five specific points of the system … View Resource

  • Grace Alone Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2009 | Matthew 13

    Soli Deo gloria is the motto that grew out of the Protestant Reformation and was used on every composition by Johann Sebastian Bach. He affixed the initials SDG at the bottom of each manuscript to communicate the idea that it is God and God alone who is to receive the glory for the wonders of His work of creation and of redemption. At the heart of the sixteenth-century controversy over salvation was the issue of grace. It was not a question of man’s need for grace. It was a question as to the extent of that need. The church had … View Resource

  • Moving Toward the Goal of History Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2009

    What goes around, comes around.” This American idiom suggests a view of history that has more in common with ancient Greek philosophy than with the Judeo-Christian understanding of history. The grand difference between the ancient view of history and that found in Scripture is the difference between what is called “cyclical” and “linear-progressive.” A cyclical view indicates that there was no beginning to the universe and no goal for it; rather, history creates itself and eventually repeats itself—forever. It was this ancient perspective that generated the skepticism that inspired Friedrich Nietzsche’s view of “the myth of eternal recurrence.” Over against … View Resource

  • Our Father… Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2003

    My first class at the Free University of Amsterdam shattered my academic complacency. It was cultural shock, an exercise in contrasts. It started the moment the professor, Dr. G.C. Berkouwer, entered the room. At his appearance, every student stood at attention until he mounted the podium steps, opened his notebook, and silently nodded for the students to be seated. He then began his lecture, and the students, in a holy hush, dutifully listened and wrote notes for the hour. No one ever dared to interrupt or distract the master by presuming to raise his hand. The session was dominated by … View Resource

  • Right Now Counts Forever Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2007

    The following article first appeared in the May 1977 issue of Tabletalk magazine. This column’s title, “Right Now Counts Forever” is designed to focus attention on the relevancy of our present lives to the eternal destinies we all face. We live in a culture that places the stress on “right now.” It’s called the “Pepsi Generation”; we are told to live life with “gusto” because we “only go around once.” Short-range goals, pragmatic methods of problem solving, a quiet hysteria to make it happen “now,” all point to modern man’s despair regarding the future. The unspoken assumption is that it’s … View Resource

  • The Role of Experience Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2017

    We’re living in a day when personal experience has been elevated above everything else as the final criterion of right and wrong. Just think of all of the people who try to justify themselves on the basis of what they feel. Divorce is routinely excused on the basis of a married couple’s no longer feeling like they are in love. We are told that homosexuality should be embraced as a moral good because some homosexuals report having felt an attraction to the same sex from a young age. Even many professing Christians make their decisions about right and wrong based … View Resource

  • Statism Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008

    A decree went out from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be registered….” In Luke 2, the well-known passage introducing the nativity story, the title accorded to the Roman emperor is Caesar Augustus. Had this census been mandated earlier under the monarchy of Julius Caesar, the Scripture would read: “A decree went out from Julius Caesar….” Had Octavian followed the model of Julius, he would have called himself Octavianus Caesar, and then the text would read: “A decree went out from Octavianus Caesar….” But we note Octavius’ explicit change of his personal name to the title Caesar Augustus. This … View Resource

  • The Unholy Pursuit of God in Moby Dick Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2011

    It seems that every time a writer picks up a pen or turns on his word processor to compose a literary work of fiction, deep in his bosom resides the hope that somehow he will create the Great American Novel. Too late. That feat has already been accomplished and is as far out of reach for new novelists as is Joe DiMaggio’s fifty-six-game hitting streak or Pete Rose’s record of cumulative career hits for a rookie baseball player. The Great American Novel was written more than a hundred and fifty years ago by Herman Melville. This novel, the one that … View Resource

  • What Is the Church? Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2016

    Paul gives great attention to ecclesiology, the doctrine of the church, in his letter to the Ephesians. In fact, we could say Ephesians answers this question: What is the church? In Ephesians 2:19–22, the chief metaphor Paul uses is that of a building—the household of God. Christians are part of the household in the sense that they have been adopted into the family of God, which is another image that Scripture uses to describe the church. But here the accent is not so much on the family of the household as it is on the house of the household: “[We] … View Resource

  • What Time is It? Audio Message by R.C. Sproul

    Americans are slaves to the clock. We strap them around our wrists, hang them on the walls, and put them just about anywhere we can to tell us where we are chronologically. As accurate as clocks are, they don’t tell us everything. They don’t tell you when it is time to cry, or laugh, or when it is time to keep or throw away. What time is it in your life right now? Continuing this study on the book of Ecclesiastes, Dr. Sproul teaches us about an alternate way of measuring time in our lives. View Resource

  • When Towers Fall Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    When a catastrophe happens in our world, it is virtually certain that a question will come up: “Where was God?” People always seem to question how a good God could allow a terrible thing to happen. The same question came up in Jesus’ time, as we see from an incident recorded in Luke’s Gospel: There were some present at that very time who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. And he answered them, “Do you think that these Galileans were worse sinners than all the other Galileans, because they suffered in this way? … View Resource

  • Zeal Without Knowledge Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2002

    Many people are surprised, and some are shocked, when they hear of my involvement in the charismatic movement years ago. It began in 1965, shortly after I returned from graduate study in Holland to teach philosophy and theology at my alma mater. Some of my senior students who were preparing for ministry kept talking to me excitedly about their experiences with the Holy Spirit and about receiving the gift of tongues. My first response was profound skepticism, because my only previous experience had been with hardcore Pentecostals whose views of sanctification I deemed aberrant. Soon, however, the sheer number of … View Resource