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  • Give Me Scotland, or I Die” by Burk Parsons

    Perhaps more than anything else, John Knox is known for his prayer “Give me Scotland, or I die.” Knox’s prayer was not an arrogant demand, but the passionate plea of a man willing to die for the sake of the …Read More

  • The History of the Reformation by R.C. Sproul

    A cesspool of heresies.” This was the judgment rendered by Holy Roman Emperor Charles V on May 26, 1521, shortly after Luther took a stand at the Diet of Worms. Earlier, in the bull Exsurge Domine, Pope Leo X described …Read More

  • Always Abusing Semper Reformanda by R. Scott Clark

    The Reformation churches have some wonderful slogans that are chock full of important truths. Sometimes, however, these slogans can be misconstrued, misreported, and misunderstood. With the possible exception of sola Scriptura (by Scripture alone), none of these slogans has been …Read More

  • Semper Reformanda by Michael Horton

    If you’ve been in Protestant circles for very long, whether conservative or liberal, you may have heard the phrase “reformed and always reforming” or sometimes just “always reforming.” I hear it a lot these days, especially from friends who want …Read More

  • Biblical Authority by Stephen Nichols

    It’s one of those moments we wish we could have seen firsthand. It took place in the square before the Water Gate. At daybreak, Ezra brought out the law. He unrolled the scroll and began reading. He kept on until …Read More

  • The Courage to Be Reformed by Burk Parsons

    When we come to grasp Reformed theology, it’s not only our understanding of salvation that changes, but our understanding of everything. It’s for this reason that when people wrestle through the rudimentary doctrines of Reformed theology and come to comprehend …Read More

  • Justification by Faith Alone by W. Robert Godfrey

    Celebrations in 2017 of the five-hundredth anniversary of the Reformation will return again and again to the subject of justification by faith alone, one of the Reformation’s most critical rediscoveries. That subject is so important that in one sense we …Read More

  • Reformed Piety and Practice by R. Scott Clark

    When Martin Luther (1483–1546) entered the Augustinian convent at Erfurt in 1505, it was a considered decision and the fulfillment of a vow he had made when he cried, “St. Anne, help me! I will become a monk.” So he …Read More

  • The Centrality of Worship by Jeffrey Jue

    Martin Luther’s recovery of the doctrine of justification by faith alone served as the theological foundation for the Protestant Reformation. He arrived at this orthodox position after a careful study of Scripture along with the conviction that Scripture alone is …Read More

  • Divinely Instituted Sacraments by R. Scott Clark

    One is sometimes left with the impression from defenders of Roman Catholicism, newscasters, and even docents in British and European cathedrals that the Reformation crept into the church and stole five ancient sacraments when no one was looking. This is …Read More

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