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  • An 11th Century Reformer by Burk Parsons

    According to tradition, following the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, William the Conqueror, the Duke of Normandy, captured the English throne. As a result, Edgar the Atheling of England was unable to secure his rightful claim to the English …Read More

  • Always Abusing Semper Reformanda by R. Scott Clark

    The Reformation churches have some wonderful slogans that are chock full of important truths. Sometimes, however, these slogans can be misconstrued, misreported, and misunderstood. With the possible exception of sola Scriptura (by Scripture alone), none of these slogans has been …Read More

  • Always Changing? by William W. Goligher

    The phrase semper reformanda has been translated to mean “always changing” and hijacked in the interests of change for the sake of change. To many, this means that everything—from what we believe to how we conduct ourselves in a fast-changing …Read More

  • The Anglican Way by Gerald Bray

    The English Reformation produced the Book of Common Prayer and the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion as its foundational documents. Both represent the more Reformed (as opposed to Lutheran) phase of the English reformation, though they are closer to patristic and …Read More

  • Anselm by R.C. Sproul

    Anselm held the position of archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. A Benedictine monk, philosopher, and theologian, he stands as one of the most significant thinkers in the history of the Western church. His influence is not due to …Read More

  • Call ‘Em Evangeliberals by Douglas Wilson

    Of course, modern evangelicalism and liberalism are not identical. They have differing histories, traditions, customs, and so forth. Also, as movements, they have compromised with worldliness in very different ways, and oddly enough, that particular difference reveals their internal similarities. …Read More

  • Calvin as a Controversialist by Cornelius Van Til

    Calvin’s activity as a controversialist began with his “sudden conversion” to the Protestant faith. To become a Protestant was, for Calvin as well as for Luther, to become an Augustinian who tested Augustine’s teaching by Scripture. All controversies about the …Read More

  • The Centrality of Worship by Jeffrey Jue

    Martin Luther’s recovery of the doctrine of justification by faith alone served as the theological foundation for the Protestant Reformation. He arrived at this orthodox position after a careful study of Scripture along with the conviction that Scripture alone is …Read More

  • A Century of Change by Nicholas Needham

    Some people see the Protestant Reformation as a miraculous restoration of Apostolic Christianity that God dropped into history immediately from above. This view once held sway particularly in the American Protestant mind. It was, however, effectively challenged in the mid-nineteenth …Read More

  • Crossing the Channel by R.C. Sproul

    The rapid spread of the Protestant Reformation from Wittenberg, Germany, throughout Europe and across the Channel to England was not spawned by the efforts of a globe-trotting theological entrepreneur. On the contrary, for the most part Martin Luther’s entire career …Read More

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