Topics

  • Guardian of the Word by Andrew Hoffecker

    The founders of the first Presbyterian seminary in America wanted it to be synonymous with Reformed theology. They intended Princeton Seminary to produce pastors and scholars sound in doctrine, fervent in piety, and committed to defending traditional Calvinism. Benjamin B. …Read More

  • A History of Islam by Ryan Reeves

    In AD 622, Muhammad and his followers took flight from Mecca to Medina—an event known as the Hijra. This date is seen as the beginning point of the Islamic faith. It is the start not only of the Islamic calendar …Read More

  • In the Wisdom and Providence of God by Burk Parsons

    The first time I heard R.C. Sproul speak was at a Ligonier Ministries’ National Conference. As he systematically unfolded the doctrines of grace, he boldly proclaimed the biblical Gospel, and at the end of his message, he pointed his finger …Read More

  • In Word and Deed by Burk Parsons

    We have all heard the saying: “Practice what you preach.” Early in my ministerial training, I became convinced of the importance of the truth that Christians, particularly preachers, should practice what they preach. After several years of working to ensure …Read More

  • The Key to C.S. Lewis by Gene Edward Veith

    C.S. Lewis was not only a Christian apologist and lay theologian. He was also an unusually imaginative and creative novelist. And in his day job at Oxford and then Cambridge he was an astonishingly perceptive and influential literary scholar. At …Read More

  • A Life of Integrity by George Grant

    He was one of the most important English writers of the eighteenth century. Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) ranks right up with William Shakespeare and G.K. Chesterton as among the most quoted prose stylists in the English language. Indeed, it has long …Read More

  • Living Stones by Frank Farrell

    The greatest news that ever broke upon the world, the news that was to change the whole life of humanity and shake down thrones and revolutionize kingdoms, the news which still today girdles the earth with everlasting hope and sends …Read More

  • Not of this World by George Grant

    By almost any modern definition, Jan Comenius (1592–1670) was anything but a success. Though Herman Bavink called him “the greatest figure of the second generation of reformers” he is practically forgotten today. Though Andrew Bonar said he was “the truest …Read More

  • Objective Cultural Norms by George Grant

    For Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), the principle of “all things to all men” was not a moral warrant for upholding cultural relativism. Instead, it was a practical mandate for upholding cultural norms. It was for him an inducement to communicate …Read More

  • An Ordinary Girl of Extraordinary Faith by Simonetta Carr

    As sixteen-year-old Lady Jane Grey stood on the scaffold on a gray winter morning, she looked calmly out over the crowd of spectators. Then, mustering the strength she had asked God to provide, she spoke with such a poise and …Read More

Topics