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Summary

Although a controversial figure in his own day, St. Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225-74) forged a unique synthesis of faith and reason, of ancient philosophy and sacred scripture, which decisively influenced Dante and the whole subsequent Catholic tradition.

Intensely interested in Aristotle, as well as Plato, Paul and Augustine, Thomas believed that unaided human thought can take us a long way towards wisdom and truth, although it must always be supplemented by the central mystery of revelation. His writings contain many classic statements of doctrine about angels, the Incarnation, Trinity, sacraments and the soul, and also penetrating discussions on choice, creation and conscience, law, logic and the purpose of life.

In this superb selection, arranged chronologically, Ralph McInerny brings together sermons, commentary responses to criticism and substantial extracts from one of Christianity’s supreme masterpieces, the Summa theologiae. For anyone concerned to find ways of reconciling science and reason and religion, Thomas has always been a major source inspiration. This volume reveals both the development and sheer scope of his work.

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