• A History of Islam by Ryan Reeves

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2016

    In AD 622, Muhammad and his followers took flight from Mecca to Medina—an event known as the Hijra. This date is seen as the beginning point of the Islamic faith. It is the start not only of the Islamic calendar …Read More

  • Hymnody in the Making: An Interview with Jeff Lippencott and R.C. Sproul by Jeff Lippencott

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2015

    Tabletalk: How did you become interested in composing hymns? R.C. Sproul: During the Reformation, Martin Luther wanted to reform the whole church—primarily at the point of doctrine. But he also said that the life of the church has to …Read More

  • A Whole New World by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    I’m not the world’s best shopper, and he may well be the hardest man in the world to shop for, and so I cringe each year as Father’s Day, Christmas, or my father’s birthday approaches. This …Read More

  • The Spanish Inquisition by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    In 1492, Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain sponsored Christopher Columbus and his voyage to the New World. But in 1477, they were behind something far more infamous. In that year, the Spanish monarchs petitioned Pope Sixtus IV to revive the …Read More

  • The Goose by Aaron Denlinger

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    If he were prophetic, he must have meant Martin Luther, who shone about a hundred years after.” So wrote John Foxe in his sixteenth-century Book of Martyrs, referring to a statement attributed to the Bohemian reformer Jan Hus on the …Read More

  • The Dawn of Reformation by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    The brightest object in the sky, after the sun and moon, is the morning star. It appears about an hour before dawn. John Wycliffe (c. 1330-84) is often called the “Morning Star of the Reformation,” and for good reason, for …Read More

  • The Fifteenth Century by Nicholas Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2015

    The fifteenth century is best known as the age of the Renaissance, which in many ways sowed seeds that would bloom into the sixteenth-century Reformation. This aspect of history was well captured in the sixteenth-century saying “Erasmus [prince of Renaissance …Read More

  • Setting the Stage by Ryan Reeves

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    Of all the centuries of church history, the fifteenth century is one of the most pitiable. In popular imagination, it is a bridge between the medieval and the Reformation worlds. And while it may be important for the journey, few …Read More

  • Where Did I Go Wrong? by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2015

    It’s a thrilling episode—Martin Luther, standing before the Diet of Worms, the only faithful Christian in his day, proclaiming his God-given right to read the Bible however he saw fit: “Unless I am convinced by my self-determined understanding of …Read More

  • Always Changing? by William W. Goligher

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014

    The phrase semper reformanda has been translated to mean “always changing” and hijacked in the interests of change for the sake of change. To many, this means that everything—from what we believe to how we conduct ourselves in a fast-changing …Read More

  • The True Reformers by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014

    Semper reformanda has been hijacked. It is one of the more abused, misused, and misunderstood slogans of our day. Progressives have captured and mutilated the seventeenth-century motto and have demanded that our theology, our churches, and our confessions be always …Read More

  • Always Abusing Semper Reformanda by R. Scott Clark

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014

    The Reformation churches have some wonderful slogans that are chock full of important truths. Sometimes, however, these slogans can be misconstrued, misreported, and misunderstood. With the possible exception of sola Scriptura (by Scripture alone), none of these slogans has been …Read More

  • Ideally Speaking by David Hall

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014

    Most Westerners have forgotten their Latin, if they ever knew it. If they’re not careful, therefore, they may confuse the Latin motto ecclesia reformata, semper reformanda with the U.S. Marines’ motto, Semper fi. There could be worse things …Read More

  • What Semper Reformanda Is and Isn’t by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014

    There are many familiar phrases with which everyone would agree. “It would be a good thing to eliminate world poverty” is one that comes to mind. What is interesting, of course, is that while there may be agreement on the …Read More

  • Semper Reformanda in its Historical Context by W. Robert Godfrey

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014

    The phrase ecclesia reformata, semper reformanda (the church reformed, always reforming) has been used so often as to make it a motto or slogan. People have used it to support a surprising array of theological and ecclesiastical programs and purposes …Read More