• Pilgrims (and Their Hosts) by R. Scott Clark

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    There are about sixty-million evangelicals in North America. By contrast, the confessional Reformed communions number fewer than one million members. One effect of these disproportionate numbers is that the theology, piety, and practice of American evangelicals shape the expectations of …Read More

  • Crossing the Channel by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    The rapid spread of the Protestant Reformation from Wittenberg, Germany, throughout Europe and across the Channel to England was not spawned by the efforts of a globe-trotting theological entrepreneur. On the contrary, for the most part Martin Luther’s entire career …Read More

  • Where Did I Go Wrong? by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2015

    It’s a thrilling episode—Martin Luther, standing before the Diet of Worms, the only faithful Christian in his day, proclaiming his God-given right to read the Bible however he saw fit: “Unless I am convinced by my self-determined understanding of …Read More

  • The Fourteenth Century by Nicholas Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2014

    The papacy had reached the zenith of its political power in Europe under Innocent III. His death in 1216 was followed by a period of eclipse and, finally, catastrophe. The popes continued to struggle for supremacy against Germany’s “Holy …Read More

  • The Scottish Reformation by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    His name was Patrick Hamilton. He was born into nobility. His mother’s father was the second son of the king. As a young man of only thirteen, he was given a position of abbot, which supplied a handsome income …Read More

  • The Reformation Isn’t Over by James White

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    You do not want to end up on the wrong side of history.” This platitude has been granted prognostic status in our day, though one could properly question its fundamental truthfulness. It reflects, however, the prevailing attitude of Western culture …Read More

  • Anselm by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    Anselm held the position of archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. A Benedictine monk, philosopher, and theologian, he stands as one of the most significant thinkers in the history of the Western church. His influence is not due to …Read More

  • Dream a Little Dream by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    It is a great thing to dream great dreams. A small vision of God and His kingdom will birth a small vision of the future. Jesus, who has already overcome the world, promised His followers that they would do greater …Read More

  • Always Abusing Semper Reformanda by R. Scott Clark

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014

    The Reformation churches have some wonderful slogans that are chock full of important truths. Sometimes, however, these slogans can be misconstrued, misreported, and misunderstood. With the possible exception of sola Scriptura (by Scripture alone), none of these slogans has been …Read More

  • The Anglican Way by Gerald Bray

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    The English Reformation produced the Book of Common Prayer and the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion as its foundational documents. Both represent the more Reformed (as opposed to Lutheran) phase of the English reformation, though they are closer to patristic and …Read More

  • The Fifteenth Century by Nicholas Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2015

    The fifteenth century is best known as the age of the Renaissance, which in many ways sowed seeds that would bloom into the sixteenth-century Reformation. This aspect of history was well captured in the sixteenth-century saying “Erasmus [prince of Renaissance …Read More

  • Give Me Scotland, or I Die” by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    Perhaps more than anything else, John Knox is known for his prayer “Give me Scotland, or I die.” Knox’s prayer was not an arrogant demand, but the passionate plea of a man willing to die for the sake of …Read More

  • The Great Schism of 1054 by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    You had to see it to believe it. During the pope’s September 2010 visit to the United Kingdom, one protester’s sign stood out, far out, from the others. In large markered letters on the back of a pizza box, the …Read More

  • A History of Islam by Ryan Reeves

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2016

    In AD 622, Muhammad and his followers took flight from Mecca to Medina—an event known as the Hijra. This date is seen as the beginning point of the Islamic faith. It is the start not only of the Islamic calendar …Read More

  • The History of the Reformation by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1995

    A cesspool of heresies.” This was the judgment rendered by Holy Roman Emperor Charles V on May 26, 1521, shortly after Luther took a stand at the Diet of Worms. Earlier, in the bull Exsurge Domine, Pope Leo X …Read More