• Pilgrims (and Their Hosts) by R. Scott Clark

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    There are about sixty-million evangelicals in North America. By contrast, the confessional Reformed communions number fewer than one million members. One effect of these disproportionate numbers is that the theology, piety, and practice of American evangelicals shape the expectations of …Read More

  • Crossing the Channel by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    The rapid spread of the Protestant Reformation from Wittenberg, Germany, throughout Europe and across the Channel to England was not spawned by the efforts of a globe-trotting theological entrepreneur. On the contrary, for the most part Martin Luther’s entire …Read More

  • The History of the Reformation by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1995

    A cesspool of heresies.” This was the judgment rendered by Holy Roman Emperor Charles V on May 26, 1521, shortly after Luther took a stand at the Diet of Worms. Earlier, in the bull Exsurge Domine, Pope Leo X described …Read More

  • The Reformation Isn’t Over by James White

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    You do not want to end up on the wrong side of history.” This platitude has been granted prognostic status in our day, though one could properly question its fundamental truthfulness. It reflects, however, the prevailing attitude of Western culture …Read More

  • The Great Schism of 1054 by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    You had to see it to believe it. During the pope’s September 2010 visit to the United Kingdom, one protester’s sign stood out, far out, from the others. In large markered letters on the back of a pizza …Read More

  • The Original Geneva Bible by Roger Nicole

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1995

    Christianity is the religion of the Incarnate Word, Jesus Christ, and of the written Word, the Bible. Wherever Christianity has gone, it has developed translations of Scripture as a necessity. The promise of Pentecost, where people of various origin heard …Read More

  • Give Me Scotland, or I Die” by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    Perhaps more than anything else, John Knox is known for his prayer “Give me Scotland, or I die.” Knox’s prayer was not an arrogant demand, but the passionate plea of a man willing to die for the sake of …Read More

  • Is the Reformation Over? by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2009

    Is the Reformation over? There have been several observations rendered on this subject by those I would call “erstwhile evangelicals.” One of them wrote, “Luther was right in the sixteenth century, but the question of justification is not an issue …Read More

  • How the Scots Changed the World by Aaron Denlinger

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    The sixteenth-century Scottish divines (pastors and theologians) who labored to build a national church characterized by sound doctrine and biblical worship never realized how far their influence would reach. They aimed, after all, to reform the Kirk, not to change …Read More

  • The Scottish Reformation by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    His name was Patrick Hamilton. He was born into nobility. His mother’s father was the second son of the king. As a young man of only thirteen, he was given a position of abbot, which supplied a handsome income …Read More

  • Dream a Little Dream by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    It is a great thing to dream great dreams. A small vision of God and His kingdom will birth a small vision of the future. Jesus, who has already overcome the world, promised His followers that they would do greater …Read More

  • Scripture Alone by Michael Kruger

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2012

    We live in a world filled with competing truth claims. Every day, we are bombarded with declarations that something is true and that something else is false. We are told what to believe and what not to believe. We are …Read More

  • John Knox by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    It might be difficult for a visitor to Scotland in 2014 to believe that the nation was a backwater country five hundred years ago. In fact, however, one sixteenth-century writer could, without fear of contradiction, describe it as “a corner …Read More