• Hymnody in the Making: An Interview with Jeff Lippencott and R.C. Sproul by Jeff Lippencott

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2015

    Tabletalk: How did you become interested in composing hymns? R.C. Sproul: During the Reformation, Martin Luther wanted to reform the whole church—primarily at the point of doctrine. But he also said that the life of the church has to …Read More

  • An 11th Century Reformer by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    According to tradition, following the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, William the Conqueror, the Duke of Normandy, captured the English throne. As a result, Edgar the Atheling of England was unable to secure his rightful claim to the English …Read More

  • Fueling Reformation by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2010

    I’m always puzzled when I see church billboards announcing a coming revival. They give the times and the dates when the church will be engaged in revival. But I wonder, how can anybody possibly schedule a revival? True revivals …Read More

  • Staging a Reformation by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    Having served R.C. Sproul during the past several years, I have enjoyed the great privilege of answering to many of his humorous nicknames by which he addresses me. Over the past few years he has adopted one in …Read More

  • The Reform of the English Church by Peter Toon

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    In America today “separation of church and state” is basic to both political and theological thinking. In contrast, in the sixteenth century in England the union of church and state was taken for granted as governed and guided by divine …Read More

  • Call ‘Em Evangeliberals by Douglas Wilson

    Of course, modern evangelicalism and liberalism are not identical. They have differing histories, traditions, customs, and so forth. Also, as movements, they have compromised with worldliness in very different ways, and oddly enough, that particular difference reveals their internal similarities …Read More

  • The Spanish Inquisition by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    In 1492, Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain sponsored Christopher Columbus and his voyage to the New World. But in 1477, they were behind something far more infamous. In that year, the Spanish monarchs petitioned Pope Sixtus IV to revive the …Read More

  • John Knox by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    It might be difficult for a visitor to Scotland in 2014 to believe that the nation was a backwater country five hundred years ago. In fact, however, one sixteenth-century writer could, without fear of contradiction, describe it as “a corner …Read More

  • The Dawn of Reformation by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    The brightest object in the sky, after the sun and moon, is the morning star. It appears about an hour before dawn. John Wycliffe (c. 1330-84) is often called the “Morning Star of the Reformation,” and for good reason, for …Read More

  • The Goose by Aaron Denlinger

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    If he were prophetic, he must have meant Martin Luther, who shone about a hundred years after.” So wrote John Foxe in his sixteenth-century Book of Martyrs, referring to a statement attributed to the Bohemian reformer Jan Hus on the …Read More

  • Setting the Stage by Ryan Reeves

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    Of all the centuries of church history, the fifteenth century is one of the most pitiable. In popular imagination, it is a bridge between the medieval and the Reformation worlds. And while it may be important for the journey, few …Read More

  • Anselm by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    Anselm held the position of archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. A Benedictine monk, philosopher, and theologian, he stands as one of the most significant thinkers in the history of the Western church. His influence is not due to …Read More

  • The True Reformers by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014

    Semper reformanda has been hijacked. It is one of the more abused, misused, and misunderstood slogans of our day. Progressives have captured and mutilated the seventeenth-century motto and have demanded that our theology, our churches, and our confessions be always …Read More

  • Always Abusing Semper Reformanda by R. Scott Clark

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014

    The Reformation churches have some wonderful slogans that are chock full of important truths. Sometimes, however, these slogans can be misconstrued, misreported, and misunderstood. With the possible exception of sola Scriptura (by Scripture alone), none of these slogans has been …Read More

  • Ideally Speaking by David Hall

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014

    Most Westerners have forgotten their Latin, if they ever knew it. If they’re not careful, therefore, they may confuse the Latin motto ecclesia reformata, semper reformanda with the U.S. Marines’ motto, Semper fi. There could be worse things …Read More