• Pascal by

    Often we use our imagination as a means of temporary escape from the pressures of life. We dream of an ideal world in which we are free from pain, suffering, and even death. But Ponce de Leon never did find …

  • Aquinas (Part 2) by

    When we think about the awesome nature of God, we may be tempted to say the words can’t describe it. Is God so far above us that He transcends all human language? How does the knowledge of the infinite …

  • The Renaissance Revolution by

    It seems that in our day, people choose the authority of science and philosophy over theology. But this is not a new thing. The seeds were planted long ago in Western thought during the Renaissance. Looking at “The Renaissance Revolution …

  • Plotinus and Neo-Platonism by

    In Christian thought, we derive our being from the ultimate personal, rational, and volitional Being—God. But not everyone assumes that the God who exists is a being. Continuing this study on philosophy and its consequences in our lives, Dr …

  • Plato (Part 2) by

    What is the difference between opinion and knowledge? Everyone has an opinion about something. But what is that opinion based on? Perhaps we don’t really know anything, but rather, we only think we know things, and based on that …

  • Plato (Part 1) by

    All of us should know what a person is when we see one. But if you were asked to give a definition of a person that captured the essence of personhood to the exclusion of all other creatures, what would …

  • Augustine by

    Many times we realize when our senses fail us, but how many times have they failed us, and we didn’t know it? How can we be sure we can trust our senses? Pondering these questions may leave one sceptical …

  • Socrates by

    What happened to virtue? What happened to truth? Is all hope lost in the realm of science, politics, and our court system? These are questions we ask ourselves today, but actually, they are echoes of laments from the days of …

  • Anselm by

    Is God the greatest conceivable being you can think of? Of course He is. But how do we prove the God of our thinking is actually a being in reality. Early Christian thinker, Anselm, wrote down his thoughts on this …

  • Monism and Pluralism by

    Unaided by Scripture, the pre-Socractic philosophers embarked on a quest for ultimate reality. How did we get here? What is the source of all things? What gives reality purpose and harmony?  Their answers were interesting, to say the least. In …

  • Parmenides, Heraclitus, and Zeno by

    What are you and what are you becoming? Are you the same person you were ten years ago? If not, then who are you? How can we be the same but different? Apply these questions to the cosmos, and the …

  • Aristotle (Part 1) by

    Why do acorns produce oak trees instead of something else? It may seem like a ridiculous question to our biblically informed ears, but the early philosophers of the ancient world were the acting scientists of their day trying to understand …

  • Thales by

    As Christians we are not without answers to life’s most fundamental questions. We have God’s Word to supply those answers for us. But how have others tried to resolve those ultimate questions? Beginning this new series entitled Consequences …

  • Aristotle (Part 2) by

    What is the necessary instrument for knowledge? What instrument is employed to make sense of it all? How does knowledge enter the mind? How is it interpreted? In this message, Dr. Sproul looks at these questions and teaches us about …

  • Whatever Works by

    Is there anything practical about being pragmatic? What are the long term benefits of pragmatism? Is there anything of Christian value in this philosophy? In this message entitled “Whatever Works,” Dr. Sproul uncovers the impracticality of this American-made philosophy as …