• What if the Muslims Won? by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    On October 10, 732 a.d., some 80,000 Muslim cavalrymen attacked 30,000 Frankish infantrymen near Tours in present-day France. Those Muslims had already conquered Northern Africa and Spain, and they were poised to sweep over the rest of …Read More

  • The Word of God in the Hands of Man by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2009

    It was many years ago when my grandmother related to me games that she played as a little girl in the 1880s. One game she mentioned was one that she and her Methodist girlfriends played with their Roman Catholic friends …Read More

  • Boniface

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    It is no exaggeration to say, that since the days of the great Apostle to the Gentiles no missionary of the Gospel has been more eminent in labors, in perils, in self-devotion, and in that tenacity yet elasticity of purpose …Read More

  • Peter Waldo and the Waldensians by W. Robert Godfrey

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    By the twelfth century, the church in Western Europe was indeed powerful and impressive. In the emerging Gothic architecture, we can see something of the devotion of the people and the wealth of the bishops. In the developing scholastic theology …Read More

  • The Rise of Islam by Patrick Sookhdeo

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2007

    Two things unite most Muslims: their belief in the unity of God and their veneration of Muhammad as the channel through which God’s final revelation was given. Muslims claim that God revealed the Qur’an to Muhammad whom they see as …Read More

  • The Significance of Thomas Aquinas by Ryan Reeves

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2013

    Thomas Aquinas has always been a whipping boy for theologians. In his own lifetime, his classmates referred to him as the “Dumb Ox” (a play on both his oafish size and the way his critical thinking appeared slow and pondering …Read More