• The 13th Century by Nick Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2013

    More traditionally minded Roman Catholics have seen the thirteenth century as the golden age of Roman Catholic civilization. Certainly it witnessed the papacy achieving the summit of its power over the politics and culture of Western Europe. THE REIGN OF …Read More

  • The Battle for Grace Alone by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2006

    The early part of the fifth century witnessed a serious controversy in the church that is known as the Pelagian controversy. This debate took place principally between the British monk Pelagius and the great theologian of the first millennium, Augustine …Read More

  • Bernard of Clairvaux and Mysticism by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    One has to appreciate a medieval figure whom Martin Luther and John Calvin looked on with favor and, to a certain degree, approval. The figure in question is Bernard of Clairvaux, a Cistercian monk, abbot, mild mystic, and formidable theologian …Read More

  • The Rise of Islam by Patrick Sookhdeo

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2007

    Two things unite most Muslims: their belief in the unity of God and their veneration of Muhammad as the channel through which God’s final revelation was given. Muslims claim that God revealed the Qur’an to Muhammad whom they …Read More

  • Graven Images? by Robert Letham

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    In 726, Emperor Leo’s order to destroy the image of Christ at the imperial palace provoked a riot, and a long and virulent controversy engulfed the Eastern church. Not until the Empress Irene called the second council of Nicea …Read More

  • Peter Lombard, Master of the Sentences by Andrew Hoffecker

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    The roots of Christian doctrine extend back to God’s revelation in the Old and New Testaments. In the early centuries of the church, apologists defended Christian beliefs. Ecumenical councils affirmed the Trinity and theologians fleshed out these beliefs. True …Read More

  • The Benedictine Rule by Andrew Hoffecker

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2006

    Ever since the New Testament epistles were written, Christians have received advice on how to live the Christian life. How much should we pray? What progress can we expect to make in achieving biblical holiness in this life? Is perfection …Read More

  • Gregory “the Great” by Tom Nettles

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2006

    A candid review of the accomplishments of Gregory, known as “the Great,” gives pause to an evangelical Protestant about such an exalted attribution. That he was a conservator of orthodoxy, an effective missiologist, and a zealous and clever churchman cannot …Read More

  • The New Mendicant Orders by David Hogg

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2013

    From the earliest days of the medieval period, bishops were expected to preach regularly as they visited congregations throughout their dioceses, and in their absence, there was broad support for ordained presbyters (elders) to fill the vacancy. As in our …Read More

  • Peter Abelard and the Development of Scholasticism by Gregg Allison

    Peter Abelard (AD 1079–1142) served as professor of philosophy and theology at the University of Paris and was a notable scholastic theologian. Scholasticism is the discipline and method of bringing together philosophy and theology to make God and His …Read More

  • Back to Barbarism by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2006

    We Western Christians have been sending missionaries to spread the Gospel to cultures throughout the world. We sometimes forget that, unless we have a Jewish background, our cultures too were originally evangelized by missionaries. This is certainly true for those …Read More

  • The Mission to Slovakia by Kris Lundgaard

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2009

    We, the Slovak People, bearing in mind the political and cultural heritage of our predecessors…mindful of the spiritual bequest of Cyril and Methodius…adopted this constitution.” Slovakia, lying at the crossroads of East and West in secular Europe, after …Read More

  • What if the Muslims Won? by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    On October 10, 732 a.d., some 80,000 Muslim cavalrymen attacked 30,000 Frankish infantrymen near Tours in present-day France. Those Muslims had already conquered Northern Africa and Spain, and they were poised to sweep over the rest of …Read More

  • The Word of God in the Hands of Man by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2009

    It was many years ago when my grandmother related to me games that she played as a little girl in the 1880s. One game she mentioned was one that she and her Methodist girlfriends played with their Roman Catholic friends …Read More

  • Boniface

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    It is no exaggeration to say, that since the days of the great Apostle to the Gentiles no missionary of the Gospel has been more eminent in labors, in perils, in self-devotion, and in that tenacity yet elasticity of purpose …Read More