• A Soul Ablaze by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2004

    According to Foxe’s Book of Martyrs, he was one of the greatest heroes “for the cause of truth in the whole of the history of the church.” Living through the very difficult final decades of the fourteenth century, he …Read More

  • The Meal That Divides by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2009

    On the night of the institution of the Lord’s Supper, Jesus prayed for His disciples and for those who would become His disciples, “that they may all be one” (John 17:21). This was a profound prayer for unity …Read More

  • The Lone Monk by Nick Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2007

    The seventh century is something of a forgotten epoch for most Protestants. But it is well worth knowing. The creative heart of its theology lay in the East — the Byzantine Empire, centered on Constantinople. Here the Christological controversies of the …Read More

  • All Truth Is God’s Truth by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    During the nineteenth-century potato famine in Ireland, my great-grandfather, Charles Sproul, fled his native land to seek refuge in America. He left his thatched roof and mud floor cottage in a northern Ireland village and made his way barefoot to …Read More

  • The Light of Glory by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2006

    Humanistic historians and secular sociologists are eager to assign their carefully crafted, far-reaching labels to just about anything. Centuries-long periods of history and entire generations of people have been adorned with meaningless titles and simplistic definitions. From the so called …Read More

  • God’s Truth Abideth Still by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    One could perhaps make the argument that the history of the church consists of one division after another. Nevertheless, while history is replete with ecclesiastical divisions, there is a unity that transcends all the worldly clamor and devilish confusion surrounding …Read More

  • Anskar by Bishop Rimbert

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2009

    When one of Anskar’s men suggested to his face that he could work miracles, the medieval missionary replied, “Were I worthy of such a favor from my God, I would ask that He would grant to me this one …Read More

  • War and Peace by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2008

    We all certainly agree that all virtues are heavenly and that all sins are deadly. Nevertheless, certain virtues are more heavenly than others, and certain sins lead to death more quickly than other sins. While some sins are private and …Read More

  • A ‘Great’ Leader by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2009

    These days it’s easy to become cynical about politicians, government officials, and other national leaders. Governing a country takes hard-nosed, practical realism. Morality and religion are well and good, many of us say, but someone who follows such ideals …Read More

  • The Twelfth Century by Nick Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    The twelfth century was one of the most colorful of the medieval era. Indeed, it would be no exaggeration to say that it was the age of some of the most famous and influential Christians of all time. We need …Read More

  • Peter Waldo and the Waldensians by W. Robert Godfrey

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    By the twelfth century, the church in Western Europe was indeed powerful and impressive. In the emerging Gothic architecture, we can see something of the devotion of the people and the wealth of the bishops. In the developing scholastic theology …Read More

  • The Significance of Thomas Aquinas by Ryan Reeves

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2013

    Thomas Aquinas has always been a whipping boy for theologians. In his own lifetime, his classmates referred to him as the “Dumb Ox” (a play on both his oafish size and the way his critical thinking appeared slow and pondering …Read More

  • Boethius: The Philosopher Theologian by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2006

    One of the least known but most significant Christian thinkers of antiquity was a sixth-century layman called Anicius Manlius Torquatus Severinus Boethius, or simply Boethius for short. The son of an old senatorial family, he lived between 480 and 524 …Read More

  • Our Hope in Ages Past by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2009

    Pray with your mouth, cry out with your heart, make petitions while you work, so that every day and night, every hour and moment, God may always assist you.” These are the words of the ninth-century, Christian noblewoman, Dhouda. She …Read More

  • The New Monasticism by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2013

    By the thirteenth century, the West’s idealistic wars against a fearsome Islamic threat had failed ignobly; its stagnating economy had cast a pall of depression across the once prosperous and thriving land; its national and political leaders reveled in …Read More