• Salvation and the Life After Life by Paul Helm

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    How do we estimate what a person is primarily interested in? Perhaps by seeing how often they return to the subject, or what they mention on important occasions. And perhaps, also, by the manner in which people write about things …Read More

  • Justification for Everyone by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    For years we have wrestled with the question as to whether we should produce an issue of Tabletalk devoted to the new perspectives on Paul on the doctrine of justification, and for years we concluded that many of our readers …Read More

  • The “Nonsense” of Justifying the Ungodly by David Mathis

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    There are at least three problems with N.T. Wright’s claim that imputing God’s righteousness to a defendant is a category mistake and “makes no sense.” First, Wright’s definition of the righteousness of God is too shallow …Read More

  • Works of the Law” in Paul by J.V. Fesko

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    The definition of Paul’s phrase “works of the law” is one of the more significant disagreements between N.T. Wright and the Reformation understanding of justification by faith alone. On what basis can Wright claim that Paul does not …Read More

  • Wright Is Wrong on Imputation by Thomas Schreiner

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    Is the imputation of Christ’s righteousness to the believer an artificial construct, an idea from systematic theology that does not truly come from the Bible? N.T. Wright argues that the traditional view of imputation veers away from the …Read More

  • Justification and Ecumenism by Michael Horton

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    One of the great connections that N.T. Wright emphasizes in his work is the one between soteriology (how we are saved) and ecclesiology (the church: who are the true people of God?). He properly (and repeatedly) reminds us that …Read More

  • Two Birds, One Stone by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    When error comes into the church we face a set of obligations. First, we must confront the error. The world has embraced a live-and-let-live relativism that will accept any foolishness, but will not accept the wisdom of calling foolishness by …Read More

  • Faith” and “Faithfulness” by D.A. Carson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    The Greek word pistis can mean, in English translation, both “faith” and “faithfulness”; no one disputes that fact (for the latter, see Rom. 3:3). N.T. Wright, however, takes two steps that cannot be fairly evaluated without understanding how …Read More

  • Annotated Bibliography: N.T. Wright and the New Perspectives on Paul

    Annotated bibliography of works on N.T. Wright and the New Perspectives on Paul.Read More

  • What’s Wrong with Wright: Examining the New Perspective on Paul by Phil Johnson

    My assignment in this hour is to give a critical review of an influential book by Anglican author N.T. Wright, the Bishop of Durham. The book is titled What Saint Paul Really Said. It’s a fairly thin paperback …Read More

  • Was Luther Right? by Thomas Schreiner

    Martin Luther turned the world upside down in the sixteenth century by proclaiming the Pauline gospel. Luther, who was a professor of biblical exegesis for many years, slowly came to an understanding of the righteousness of God in Rom. 1 …Read More

  • An Explanation of the New Perspective on Paul by Bryan Chapell

    First, my disclaimers: I am not a New Perspective on Paul expert. A seminary president sometimes has the role of getting up to speed on an issue that has suddenly become hot in the Church, and he should make no …Read More

  • Forensic Justification by Francis Turretin

    Is the word Justification always used in a forensic sense in this argument, or also in a moral and physical? The former we affirm, the latter we deny, against the Romanists.Read More

  • Of Justification” from “The Westminster Confession of Faith”

    1. Those whom God effectually calleth, He also freely justifieth: not by infusing righteousness into them, but by pardoning their sins, and by accounting and accepting their persons as righteous; not for any thing wrought in them, or done by …Read More

  • Martin Luther’s Definition of Faith by Martin Luther

    Faith is not what some people think it is. Their human dream is a delusion. Because they observe that faith is not followed by good works or a better life, they fall into error, even though they speak and hear …Read More