• Christmas According to the Angels (Part 2 of 3) by R. Fowler White

    In our first installment in this series, we learned that the Gospel birth announcements of the angels brought “good news of great joy” to those humbled by sin, suffering, and death. In this our second installment, we focus on two …Read More

  • Born of the Virgin Mary by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    Along with the great theologian and philosopher Anselm of Canterbury we ask the question, Cur deus homo? Why the God-man? When we look at the biblical answer to that question, we see that the purpose behind the incarnation of Christ …Read More

  • The Suffering Servant by Donald Macleod

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    John Murray, with good reason, argues that obedience is the most inclusive concept available to us for describing the redeeming work of Christ (Redemption Accomplished and Applied, p. 19). Other categories such as sacrifice and satisfaction cover some of the …Read More

  • Christmas According to the Apostle Paul - Gal 4:4-5 (Part 1 of 3) by R. Fowler White

    One of the most beloved carols that Christians sing during the Christmas season is that of William C. Dix, What Child is This? As few other carols do, the lyrics of this selection prompt us to contemplate the identity, the …Read More

  • Christmas According to the Angels (Part 3 of 3) by R. Fowler White

    In this final part of our three-part series on Christmas according to the Angels, we contemplate the truth that the birth announcements of the angels celebrated “glory to God” and “peace for man.” Consider first that the angels celebrated “glory …Read More

  • The Resurrection of Jesus by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2008

    This article on the resurrection of Jesus appears at the time of year when we are focusing on His birth, not His death and resurrection. To stop and think about the resurrection may seem like an unnecessary aside to the …Read More

  • Marley and His Message to Scrooge by R.C. Sproul

    Bah! Humbug!” These two words are instantly associated with Charles Dickens’ immortal fictional anti-hero, Ebenezer Scrooge. Scrooge was the prototype of the Grinch who stole Christmas, the paradigm of all men cynical. We all recognize that Ebenezer Scrooge was a …Read More