• The Heidelberg Catechism by Lyle Bierma

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    Q. What is your only comfort in life and in death? A. That I am not my own but belong — body and soul, in life and in death — to my faithful Savior
    Jesus Christ. 
    These are the opening lines of …Read More

  • Deeds Over Creeds by Gary L. W. Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2009

      The English Reformer Hugh Latimer once remarked, “We ought never to regard unity so much that we would or should forsake God’s Word for her sake.” Wise words from a man who went to the stake, rather than compromise …Read More

  • Drawing the Line: Why Doctrine Matters by R. Scott Clark

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2012

    Imagine Mike. He’s an unusual mechanic. Where other mechanics find natural laws (such as gravity) unavoidable and even useful, he suspects them to be arbitrary, invoked in order to stifle his creativity. We can imagine how the story ends …Read More

  • Norma Normata by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    The Latin word credo means simply “I believe.” It represents the first word of the Apostles’ Creed. Throughout church history it has been necessary for the church to adopt and embrace creedal statements to clarify the Christian faith and to …Read More

  • The Westminster Larger Catechism (1648) by Various

    Question 1: What is the chief and highest end of man? Answer: Man’s chief and highest end is to glorify God, and fully to enjoy him forever. Read More

  • The Canons of Dordt by R. Scott Clark

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    Everyone knows the acronym TULIP, but not everyone knows where this acronym comes from. The Canons of Dordt are among the most famous but unread deliverances of any Reformed Synod. The canons are more than five letters. The canons teach …Read More

  • Who Draws the Line? by Sean Michael Lucas

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2012

    As Jesus ascended into heaven, He delegated His authority to the Apostles to make disciples: “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit …Read More

  • What Is Your Only Comfort? by Kim Riddlebarger

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    Of all the Reformation-era catechisms, perhaps none is as well-loved as the Heidelberg Catechism. In the opening question and answer, the personal and distinctive tone of the catechism becomes evident. “What is your only comfort in life and in death …Read More

  • The Heidelberg Catechism (1563) by Various

    1. What is thy only comfort in life and in death? That I, with body and soul, both in life and in death, am not my own, but belong to my faithful Savior Jesus Christ, who with His precious blood …Read More

  • Enjoying God, Coram Deo by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    I am a confessional Presbyterian pastor. As such, I subscribe to the Westminster Standards, consisting of the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Larger and Shorter Catechisms. Over the years I have heard the Westminster Standards criticized for being too …Read More

  • The Athanasian Creed by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2007

    Quicumque vult— this phrase is the title attributed to what is popularly known as the Athanasian Creed. It was often called the Athanasian Creed because for centuries people attributed its authorship to Athanasius, the great champion of Trinitarian orthodoxy during …Read More

  • Scripture Alone by Michael Kruger

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2012

    We live in a world filled with competing truth claims. Every day, we are bombarded with declarations that something is true and that something else is false. We are told what to believe and what not to believe. We are …Read More

  • The Westminster Shorter Catechism (1647) by Various

    Q1: What is the chief end of man? A1: Man’s chief end is to glorify God, and to enjoy Him for ever. Read More