• Confession unto Death by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    Some people call us theological diehards “conservatives.” That term is appropriate, since we do want to conserve something. But a better word, one that we increasingly use, is “confessionals.” This term throws the emphasis on what we want to conserve …Read More

  • The Belgic Confession by Cornelis Venema

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    The Belgic Confession is one of the best known and most loved of the Reformed confessions. Philip Schaff, the venerable historian of the church and her confessions, observes that it is “upon the whole, the best symbolical statement of the …Read More

  • The Value of Confessions by Douglas Kelly

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2013

    To this day, Christian Churches, especially in the Reformation tradition, use a powerful tool for “maintaining the form of sound words” and for spreading the gospel to the world—their confessional documents. The Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century represented …Read More

  • Canons and Decrees of the Synod of Dordt (1619) by Various

    The Judgment Concerning Divine Predestination Which the Synod Declares to Be in Agreement with the Word of God and Accepted Till Now in the Reformed Churches, Set Forth in Several Articles.Read More

  • The Temptation of Idolatry by Robert Barnes

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1998

    The temptation to pursue a new way of salvation, a new path down the road to righteousness, is an eternal struggle. The Puritans experienced it and warned us of the vanity and shear arrogance of creating our own custom-fit cult …Read More

  • The Heidelberg Catechism (1563) by Various

    1. What is thy only comfort in life and in death? That I, with body and soul, both in life and in death, am not my own, but belong to my faithful Savior Jesus Christ, who with His precious blood …Read More

  • Where and How Do We Draw the Line? by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2012

    In essentials, unity. In non-essentials, liberty. In all things, charity.” Sounds nice, but which are which? Everyone wants to be unified in what really matters, to agree to disagree on what isn’t as important, and to exercise love in …Read More

  • The Westminster Confession of Faith (1647) by Various

    The original text of 1646, from the manuscript of Cornelius Burges, Assessor to the Westminster Assembly, with the Assembly’s proof texts, as published in the modern critical edition of 1937 by S. W. Carruthers. Read More

  • Scripture Alone by Michael Kruger

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2012

    We live in a world filled with competing truth claims. Every day, we are bombarded with declarations that something is true and that something else is false. We are told what to believe and what not to believe. We are …Read More

  • The Athanasian Creed by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2007

    Quicumque vult— this phrase is the title attributed to what is popularly known as the Athanasian Creed. It was often called the Athanasian Creed because for centuries people attributed its authorship to Athanasius, the great champion of Trinitarian orthodoxy during …Read More

  • Enjoying God, Coram Deo by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    I am a confessional Presbyterian pastor. As such, I subscribe to the Westminster Standards, consisting of the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Larger and Shorter Catechisms. Over the years I have heard the Westminster Standards criticized for being too …Read More

  • The Westminster Shorter Catechism (1647) by Various

    Q1: What is the chief end of man? A1: Man’s chief end is to glorify God, and to enjoy Him for ever. Read More

  • The Faith of Demons by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    While written creeds have their advantages, unwritten creeds have a few as well. With a written creed we are able to nail down precise language. We can affirm this and deny that. Everyone is able to make a conscious decision …Read More

  • This We Believe by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2008

    Many evangelical Christians are instinctively suspicious of the whole idea of creeds and confessions, those set forms of words that certain churches have used throughout the ages to give concise expression to the Christian faith. For such people, the …Read More

  • Confessionally Challenged by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    One dutchman, a theologian. Two dutchmen, a church. Three dutchmen, a schism — or so the saying goes. Though such a saying could rightly include Englishmen or Frenchmen, historically the Dutch have demonstrated their fervent tenacity for defining the truth, defending …Read More