• A Brave New World by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2008

    On September 14, 2001, as the United States was still coming to grips with al Qaeda’s assault on New York and Washington, D.C., dignitaries gathered in the national cathedral to memorialize the dead and show forth the country …Read More

  • Confessions of a Bibliophile by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a bibliophile is “A lover of books; a book-fancier.” Although this is a helpful definition, I’m not entirely sure I want to refer to myself as a “fancier” of anything. I’m from …Read More

  • The Triune God: Good, Beautiful, and True by Harry Reeder

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2010

    The Word of God clearly challenges our attempt to relativize truth, beauty, and goodness, first by declaring the Word itself true, beautiful, and good, then by revealing these as attributes of the triune God. Truth is a reality because God …Read More

  • The Greatest Treasure by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008

    C.S. Lewis, in his essay “On the Reading of Old Books,” which is found in the collection of essays, God in the Dock, argues that we are all by nature time bound. This frailty will, of necessity, give us …Read More

  • Don’t Look Back by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2004

    Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. I’ll admit I got taken in the first time. As a grade school child my conception of cool included too tight silk shirts and blue jeans with …Read More

  • Bubble Gum and the Trinity by Douglas Wilson

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1998

    I recently told a class of tenth-graders that what our culture needed was a return to Trinitarian bubble-gum commercials. They were a little nonplussed, and so I hastened to explain that as individuals with one set of ultimate commitments, we …Read More

  • The Pornographic Seduction by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2005

    Every culture is challenged by its own seductions, but our culture is confronted with the present undeniable fact that we have transformed seduction into an art form. In essence, the cultures of the West are now examples of what the …Read More

  • Church Growth—First Things First by Os Guinness

    FROM TABLETALK | March 1992

    When all is said and done, the church-growth movement will stand or fall by one question: In implementing its vision of church growth, is the church of Christ primarily guided and shaped by its own character and calling—or by …Read More

  • The Dance of Life by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2004

    The fall of Adam and Eve is one of the stickiest theological wickets we encounter in the Bible. How could both of them, whom God had declared good, do bad? But there is a stickier wicket still, perhaps made so …Read More

  • The Cult of Relevance and the Management of Need by Os Guinness

    FROM TABLETALK | June 1992

    Irony, ironically, is a profoundly biblical theme that does not figure strongly in the thinking of most Christians. Yet no other religion rivals the Christian faith in providing such a foundation for a strong view of irony. Because human unbelief …Read More

  • Error and Our Era by Ken Myers

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1994

    Truth is great and will prevail, if left to itself.” Thus asserted Thomas Jefferson, champion of free speech and enemy of established religion. I’m not sure that Jefferson entirely believed that. Jefferson did believe that only an educated, well-informed …Read More

  • Statism by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008

    A decree went out from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be registered….” In Luke 2, the well-known passage introducing the nativity story, the title accorded to the Roman emperor is Caesar Augustus. Had this census been mandated earlier …Read More

  • Cultural Evangelism, Seventh-Century Style by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2007

    Christians today often talk about evangelizing the culture, transforming the culture, and finding ways to communicate with people of another culture. What that looks like can be seen in seventh-century English literature. J.R.R. Tolkien was as great …Read More

  • Should We Care About Art? by Geoff Stevens

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2013

    During my time at art school, I took part in many group critiques of student artwork. Twenty or so of us would tack our best efforts on the wall, and then everyone would take turns criticizing them. At one such …Read More

  • Taking Thought for Tomorrow by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1999

    I’m too busy enjoying summer to think about winer,” the grasshopper told the the ant. —from the Grasshopper and the Ant, by Aseop MY FATHER’S FAVORITE BIBLE VERSE was Jesus’ admonition in the Sermon on the Mount, “Take …Read More