• An Ordinary Girl of Extraordinary Faith by Simonetta Carr

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2013

    As sixteen-year-old Lady Jane Grey stood on the scaffold on a gray winter morning, she looked calmly out over the crowd of spectators. Then, mustering the strength she had asked God to provide, she spoke with such a poise and …Read More

  • Beauty and the Princeton Piety by Andrew Hoffecker

    The Princeton Theology was an attempt to maintain Reformed theology and experience in America during the nineteenth and the opening decades of the twentieth centuries. The men at Princeton staunchly defended the objective elements in the Christian faith against the …Read More

  • Anselm by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    Anselm held the position of archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. A Benedictine monk, philosopher, and theologian, he stands as one of the most significant thinkers in the history of the Western church. His influence is not due to …Read More

  • An 11th Century Reformer by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    According to tradition, following the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, William the Conqueror, the Duke of Normandy, captured the English throne. As a result, Edgar the Atheling of England was unable to secure his rightful claim to the English …Read More

  • An Unpopular Vision by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    Some men’s greatness may be seen in how largely they loom over the movements they launched. But greater men are they whose movements loom large over them — even to the point of obscuring them from view. Gerhard Groote was …Read More

  • A Mind Captivated by God by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    I have journeyed through the land of Narnia. Nearly ten years ago, I had the privilege to stay at Rathvinden House, located in the beautiful rolling-green countryside of County Carlow, Ireland. At that time, the Rathvinden estate was owned and …Read More

  • Where Is the Glory Found? by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2009

    As birthdays go, it’s a big one. It is fitting and appropriate that we would mark the five-hundredth anniversary of the birth of John Calvin. Trouble is, that occasion is being marked in at least two different ways. First …Read More

  • The Theologian by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2009

    Thinkers in the ancient world sought to plumb the depths of ultimate reality. With that quest for ultimate reality came the birth of the discipline of philosophy. Some philosophers focused on one particular aspect of philosophy called metaphysics (ultimate being …Read More

  • Good Old Calvinism by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2009

    John Calvin was a churchman for all ages. He was a reformer par excellence. He was a godly pastor who equipped his people for ministry. He was a humble revolutionary. He was a loyal husband, father, and friend. But above …Read More

  • A Sower Went Out To Sow by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2009

    Church historian Mark Noll writes, “In many ways, the defining figure in the history of American evangelicalism is the eighteenth-century revivalist George Whitefield.” Prior to America’s declaration of independence from England, the Calvinist preacher from England turned the colonies …Read More

  • Anskar by Bishop Rimbert

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2009

    When one of Anskar’s men suggested to his face that he could work miracles, the medieval missionary replied, “Were I worthy of such a favor from my God, I would ask that He would grant to me this one …Read More

  • The Resolutions of Jonathan Edwards by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2009

    He was a young man unsure of his future. He had many gifts and not a few options before him. His father and grandfather were ministers, as were uncles and others in the family tree. He had a first-rate …Read More

  • Boniface

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    It is no exaggeration to say, that since the days of the great Apostle to the Gentiles no missionary of the Gospel has been more eminent in labors, in perils, in self-devotion, and in that tenacity yet elasticity of purpose …Read More

  • God in the Dock: The Apologetics of C. S. Lewis by Roger Nicole

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    In modern English the words apology and apologize indicate regret because some statement or action was offensive and wrong. This is not the case for “apologetics” in theology, for that discipline is intended to manifest “a point of view is …Read More

  • Surprised by Joy by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    November 22, 1963, the date of President Kennedy’s assassination, was also the day C.S. Lewis died. Seven years earlier he had thus described death: “The term is over: the holidays have begun. The dream is ended: this is …Read More