• A Life of Integrity by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    He was one of the most important English writers of the eighteenth century. Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) ranks right up with William Shakespeare and G.K. Chesterton as among the most quoted prose stylists in the English language. Indeed, it has …Read More

  • The Theologian by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2009

    Thinkers in the ancient world sought to plumb the depths of ultimate reality. With that quest for ultimate reality came the birth of the discipline of philosophy. Some philosophers focused on one particular aspect of philosophy called metaphysics (ultimate being …Read More

  • Religion, Politics, and Poetry by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    Just as it is generally assumed that religion and politics do not make for particularly pleasant dinner table conversation, it is generally assumed that they do not make for particularly pleasant poetry either. John Milton (b. 1608) sundered both assumptions …Read More

  • Contra Mundum by Ken Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    As illustrated in other articles in this issue, the fourth century was a very interesting time in the history of the church. Having undergone a great deal of persecution as a despised religion in the eyes of Rome, the conversion …Read More

  • Living Stones by Frank Farrell

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2005

    The greatest news that ever broke upon the world, the news that was to change the whole life of humanity and shake down thrones and revolutionize kingdoms, the news which still today girdles the earth with everlasting hope and sends …Read More

  • Theologian of the Word by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    Given John Owen’s Reformed, orthodox convictions, it should not be surprising to learn that he had a high view both of theology and biblical exegesis. Indeed, he regarded the two as intimately related: theology is the result of careful …Read More

  • A Passion for Truth by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    Truth is one of the most contested issues of our times. We now live in what Ralph Keyes has memorably named “the post-truth era.” Many intellectuals simply dismiss the idea of truth as a play on words and a claim …Read More

  • From Table-Talk to Tabletalk by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2007

    We love the dramatic. When we think about the Reformation we can hear the pounding of the nail into the church door as Luther dared the scholars of his time to debate his 95 theses. We see in our mind …Read More

  • Guardian of the Word by Andrew Hoffecker

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    The founders of the first Presbyterian seminary in America wanted it to be synonymous with Reformed theology. They intended Princeton Seminary to produce pastors and scholars sound in doctrine, fervent in piety, and committed to defending traditional Calvinism. Benjamin B …Read More

  • Beauty and the Princeton Piety by Andrew Hoffecker

    The Princeton Theology was an attempt to maintain Reformed theology and experience in America during the nineteenth and the opening decades of the twentieth centuries. The men at Princeton staunchly defended the objective elements in the Christian faith against the …Read More

  • A Reformation Before the Reformation by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2004

    The fourteenth century was a time of Dickensian paradox. Though it was a calamitous time of war, plague, corruption, and social disintegration, it also enjoyed a surprising number of reforms — which would in time bring renewal and restoration to the …Read More

  • Boniface

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    It is no exaggeration to say, that since the days of the great Apostle to the Gentiles no missionary of the Gospel has been more eminent in labors, in perils, in self-devotion, and in that tenacity yet elasticity of purpose …Read More

  • God Omnipotent Reigns by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2004

    Though his story is hardly the stock and trade of most church historians, James A. Garfield (1831–1881) affords us innumerable lessons about character, faith, and public service. Such lessons are especially relevant for us during these final days leading …Read More

  • Church History in Christ by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2004

    By the end of the eighteenth century, the church of Geneva had become a mere shadow of its former glory. The pulpit of John Calvin no longer thundered with the bold truths of the Protestant Reformation. It no longer broadcast …Read More