• The Pelagian Controversy by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2005

    Grant what Thou commandest, and command what Thou dost desire.” This passage from the pen of Saint Augustine of Hippo was the teaching of the great theologian that provoked one of the most important controversies in the history of the …Read More

  • Living Authority by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2005

    In the main hallway of the seminary where I studied hangs a copy of Albrecht Dürer’s masterpiece The Four Apostles. It is indeed a magnificent interpretation of the classic work that was painted by one of the seminary …Read More

  • Our Fourth-Century Fathers by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    Like America’s Founding Fathers, the Patristics are often invoked but seldom actually read. They are often referenced but seldom actually quoted. Though they are at the heart of the traditionalist sloganeering, they have in fact, only rarely actually contributed …Read More

  • Contra Mundum by Ken Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    As illustrated in other articles in this issue, the fourth century was a very interesting time in the history of the church. Having undergone a great deal of persecution as a despised religion in the eyes of Rome, the conversion …Read More

  • The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    The Edict of Milan in A.D. 313 legalized Christianity. Toleration of this new faith in Rome was not a gradual development. It happened suddenly, right after some of the most brutal persecutions of Christians. Soon, Roman officials were kissing …Read More

  • Not One Iota by Rick Gamble

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    While on earth, our Lord confirmed that He and the Father are one (John 10:30). On the other hand, He asked, “Why do you call me good, no one but my Father is good?” (Mark 10:18). Putting those …Read More

  • A Pivotal Era by John Hannah

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    It was a remarkable century. What began as the “Era of the Martyrs” under Diocletian ended with the emergence of Christianity as the religion within the empire. The fortunes of the church quickly passed from the realm of the marginalized …Read More

  • “Who do you say that I am?” by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    In the beginning was the Word. And the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” The introductory segment of the prologue of the gospel of John was the most carefully examined text of the New Testament for the …Read More

  • Out with the New, In with the Old by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    I love old things. I love old furniture, old cars, and old houses, but I especially love old books — old, dusty books. And I don’t know about you, but dust makes me sneeze. Recently, my wife and I were …Read More

  • Heresy and Those Who Fought It by Frank Farrell

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1994

    To murder the soul is worse than murdering the body, so the teaching of heresy should be punishable by death.” I have never forgotten this statement made to me 40 years ago by a monk in the Trappist monastery of …Read More

  • Heresy in the Early Church by Harold Brown

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1994

    There is nothing new under the sun,” the Preacher wrote (Eccl. 1:9). According to Professor Klaus Haacker of Wuppertal, Germany, one of the primary sources of error in theology is the desire to say something new. As a teacher …Read More