• The Heresies of Love by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2009

    God is a unity of distinct persons. The one God is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. So says the doctrine of the Trinity. Some people believe in the unity and oneness of God, but deny that He consists in different …Read More

  • Established Boundaries by Robert Letham

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    The Eastern and Western churches have understood the Trinity in rather different ways, each with distinct problems. For the East, the person of the Father is the center of divine unity. The potential danger is a subordinationist tendency, with the …Read More

  • Established Boundaries by Robert Letham

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    The Eastern and Western churches have understood the Trinity in rather different ways, each with distinct problems. For the East, the person of the Father is the center of divine unity. The potential danger is a subordinationist tendency, with the …Read More

  • The Definition of Orthodoxy by Nicholas Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    The Arian controversy in the fourth century was arguably the greatest theological controversy in the history of the church. As Protestants, we might think that the Reformation controversies of the sixteenth century were the most momentous. Without wishing to minimize …Read More

  • The Definition of Orthodoxy by Nicholas Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    The Arian controversy in the fourth century was arguably the greatest theological controversy in the history of the church. As Protestants, we might think that the Reformation controversies of the sixteenth century were the most momentous. Without wishing to minimize …Read More

  • Triune Monarchy by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    The most basic affirmation the Scriptures make regarding the nature of God is that He is one. The shema of Deuteronomy 6 reads as follows: “Hear, O Israel: the Lord our God, the Lord is one” (v. 4). These words …Read More

  • Triune Monarchy by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    The most basic affirmation the Scriptures make regarding the nature of God is that He is one. The shema of Deuteronomy 6 reads as follows: “Hear, O Israel: the Lord our God, the Lord is one” (v. 4). These words …Read More

  • A Simple Mystery by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    John Wesley is quoted as having said: “Bring me a worm that can comprehend a man, and then I will show you a man that can comprehend the triune God.” A clever statement indeed, but just as every analogy of …Read More

  • A Simple Mystery by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    John Wesley is quoted as having said: “Bring me a worm that can comprehend a man, and then I will show you a man that can comprehend the triune God.” A clever statement indeed, but just as every analogy of …Read More

  • The Trinity and Culture by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    The doctrine of the Trinity is not only essential for good theology. Getting the Trinity right is also essential for love, politics, and art. God is an absolute union of three distinct persons. Thus, Scripture teaches that “God is love …Read More

  • The Trinity and Culture by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    The doctrine of the Trinity is not only essential for good theology. Getting the Trinity right is also essential for love, politics, and art. God is an absolute union of three distinct persons. Thus, Scripture teaches that “God is love …Read More

  • Trinitarian Worship by Allen Vander Pol

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    When someone mentions Trinitarian worship, we may immediately think of the times when we make specific reference to the Trinity in our worship services. For example, we may think of some of the classic hymns of the church that mention …Read More

  • Trinitarian Worship by Allen Vander Pol

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    When someone mentions Trinitarian worship, we may immediately think of the times when we make specific reference to the Trinity in our worship services. For example, we may think of some of the classic hymns of the church that mention …Read More

  • Divine Architect by Don Kistler

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    The term economic Trinity has nothing to do with money. It has everything to do with love. God is love, and the plurality of the Godhead is an expression of love. Love requires multiplicity; that is, love requires an object …Read More

  • Divine Architect by Don Kistler

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    The term economic Trinity has nothing to do with money. It has everything to do with love. God is love, and the plurality of the Godhead is an expression of love. Love requires multiplicity; that is, love requires an object …Read More