• Don’t Look Back by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2004

    Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. I’ll admit I got taken in the first time. As a grade school child my conception of cool included too tight silk shirts and blue jeans with more …Read More

  • Where Is Your Treasure? by John Petersen

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2008

    As I was flipping through the television channels recently, I was overwhelmed to see how secularism is influencing our culture today, particularly through advertising. In the teaching series Christian Worldview, Dr. Sproul describes secularism as that which looks at reality …Read More

  • Something New Under the Sun by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2010

    Imagine, if you would, that you are the most powerful person in the world. Now imagine that you are also the richest person in the world. Would your life be fundamentally different? Would everything that is now ordinary about your …Read More

  • Civilization & Its Discontents by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    Sometimes the lofty are rather low. Paul in writing to the Corinthians enjoins them, and therefore us, to “destroy arguments and every lofty opinion raised against the knowledge of God.” Though the giddy optimism of our Enlightenment fathers has …Read More

  • The Making of Many Bibles by Ken Myers

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1995

    Martin Luther’s “outlaw” period, as he hid in the Wartburg castle masquerading as the mysterious “Squire George,” provided him a venue to fulfill a long-held desire: the translation of the New Testament into German. He believed (in the words …Read More

  • The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    The Edict of Milan in A.D. 313 legalized Christianity. Toleration of this new faith in Rome was not a gradual development. It happened suddenly, right after some of the most brutal persecutions of Christians. Soon, Roman officials were kissing …Read More

  • Poet of the Reformation by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    Christians have a rich cultural heritage, but these days they are often oblivious to it. I suspect most American Christians have no idea who George Herbert was — other than, perhaps, the first two names of President Bush I (“George …Read More

  • Right Now Counts Forever by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2010

    It was Augustine who argued that every sin is a failure to love ordinately. Sin is the result of either loving something more than we ought or the result of loving something less than we ought. We are to love …Read More

  • This Pornographic Life by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2008

    Well, you’ve done it again. Once more, you find yourself looking where you ought not. And this you have willfully done. Yes, you’ve begged God to remove this blight, these gross desires. You even made some headway. But you’ve gone off …Read More

  • Life and Liberty by W. Robert Godfrey

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008

    Life” and “Liberty” are terms that have powerful and positive connotative value to us. We are “pro-life” and “pro-liberty.” Such emotionally-laden terms can be definitionally evasive, however, since they stir our passions as well as our reason. As we consider …Read More

  • Compromising Truth and Practice by Walter Chantry

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2010

    Just before Jesus was taken up into heaven He told His disciples: “You will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to …Read More

  • Ordained by God by Douglas Kelly

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2004

    In the 1950s, a very popular song proclaimed “He’s got the whole world in his hands!” Insofar as it had any theological content, it presumably spoke of the beneficent control by the Lord of all that He has made …Read More

  • Objective Cultural Norms by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2004

    For Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), the principle of “all things to all men” was not a moral warrant for upholding cultural relativism. Instead, it was a practical mandate for upholding cultural norms. It was for him an inducement to communicate …Read More

  • Worldly Standards by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2006

    I was asked recently what my favorite sports and hobbies are. My reply was simple: My favorite sports are hunting, fishing, and eating, and similarly, my favorite hobbies are talking about hunting, fishing, and eating. Although my abilities to hunt …Read More

  • Kingdoms in Conflict by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2007

    It is the special gift of the serpent that he is not only able to construct his own diabolical versions of the things of God but that he is able in turn to disguise what he is doing. He …Read More