• Discerning the News by Sarah Bailey

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    It’s no secret that many Christians harbor deep skepticism of the “liberal media elite.” Some have been burned by the media, noting unfair or unfriendly coverage from the past. “I never just accept what newspapers say about people. I …Read More

  • How Consumer Culture Fuels Change by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2010

    Discussion of culture has become a virtual shibboleth in contemporary evangelicalism, left and right. Whether this is itself a biblical imperative or merely a cultural reaction to a time when fundamentalism ruled the roost is a matter for debate. Indeed …Read More

  • Right Now Counts Forever by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2010

    It was Augustine who argued that every sin is a failure to love ordinately. Sin is the result of either loving something more than we ought or the result of loving something less than we ought. We are to love …Read More

  • The Devil in the Details by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2007

    The Christian is engaged in a three-front war. The Bible, replete with martial language, bears this out. The great evil trinity against which we fight is the world, the flesh, and the Devil. In our day we have made …Read More

  • A Brave New World by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2008

    On September 14, 2001, as the United States was still coming to grips with al Qaeda’s assault on New York and Washington, D.C., dignitaries gathered in the national cathedral to memorialize the dead and show forth the country …Read More

  • Committed Surrender by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2005

    Therefore, let those who suffer according to God’s will entrust their souls to a faithful Creator” (1 Peter 4:19). Whatever happened to dating? I first noticed a decline in dating when our daughter, Jamie, was in high school …Read More

  • The Death of Pride by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    I once had a girlfriend who was a classic liberal. Don’t misunderstand. She wasn’t a classical liberal, that is, one with a profound desire for liberty, one who was skeptical about the role of the state. No, strangely …Read More

  • Church Growth—Weaknesses to Watch by Os Guinness

    FROM TABLETALK | February 1992

    Like many movements, the church-growth movement is a grand mixture of things good, bad, and in-between. After stressing its significance last month, I will not comment further on its good parts—except to say that anything that “goes without saying …Read More

  • Poet of the Reformation by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    Christians have a rich cultural heritage, but these days they are often oblivious to it. I suspect most American Christians have no idea who George Herbert was — other than, perhaps, the first two names of President Bush I (“George Herbert …Read More

  • Beacon of Holiness by Alistair Begg

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    If the Word does not dwell with power in us,” wrote Puritan John Owen, “it will not pass with power from us” (The Works of John Owen, vol. 16, p. 76.). This godly minister personified this truth in his personal …Read More

  • Life and Liberty by W. Robert Godfrey

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008

    Life” and “Liberty” are terms that have powerful and positive connotative value to us. We are “pro-life” and “pro-liberty.” Such emotionally-laden terms can be definitionally evasive, however, since they stir our passions as well as our reason. As we consider …Read More

  • The Antidote to Post-humanism by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    Are you ready for the posthuman future? We are living in an age of radical transformations in science, technology, and worldview. Standing at the center of the worldview now dominant in our society is an affirmation that human beings have …Read More

  • Two Thumbs Down by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    Neil Postman, in his delightful albeit ominous book Amusing Ourselves to Death, draws an insightful comparison between two important dystopian novels. Utopian novels, of course, are those designed to show us edenic cultures. Dystopian novels show us hellish futures.Read More

  • Something New Under the Sun by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2010

    Imagine, if you would, that you are the most powerful person in the world. Now imagine that you are also the richest person in the world. Would your life be fundamentally different? Would everything that is now ordinary about your …Read More

  • Kingdoms in Conflict by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2007

    It is the special gift of the serpent that he is not only able to construct his own diabolical versions of the things of God but that he is able in turn to disguise what he is doing. He …Read More