• The War to End All Wars by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    It has long been my habit, which is fitting for the abiding theme of my column here, whenever I speak somewhere, to remind those to whom I am speaking of our historical context. Context is everything. My goal isn’t …Read More

  • The Antidote to Post-humanism by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    Are you ready for the posthuman future? We are living in an age of radical transformations in science, technology, and worldview. Standing at the center of the worldview now dominant in our society is an affirmation that human beings have …Read More

  • Changing the World by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2005

    Pop culture is a sanitizing force. No, it doesn’t make the world a cleaner place. It just makes us all the more the same. We are a world awash in golden arches, swooshes, and the real thing. Because people …Read More

  • Don’t Look Back by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2004

    Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. I’ll admit I got taken in the first time. As a grade school child my conception of cool included too tight silk shirts and blue jeans with …Read More

  • Civilization & Its Discontents by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    Sometimes the lofty are rather low. Paul in writing to the Corinthians enjoins them, and therefore us, to “destroy arguments and every lofty opinion raised against the knowledge of God.” Though the giddy optimism of our Enlightenment fathers has dimmed …Read More

  • The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    The Edict of Milan in A.D. 313 legalized Christianity. Toleration of this new faith in Rome was not a gradual development. It happened suddenly, right after some of the most brutal persecutions of Christians. Soon, Roman officials were kissing …Read More

  • Right Now Counts Forever by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2010

    It was Augustine who argued that every sin is a failure to love ordinately. Sin is the result of either loving something more than we ought or the result of loving something less than we ought. We are to love …Read More

  • Beacon of Holiness by Alistair Begg

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    If the Word does not dwell with power in us,” wrote Puritan John Owen, “it will not pass with power from us” (The Works of John Owen, vol. 16, p. 76.). This godly minister personified this truth in his personal …Read More

  • The Death of Pride by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    I once had a girlfriend who was a classic liberal. Don’t misunderstand. She wasn’t a classical liberal, that is, one with a profound desire for liberty, one who was skeptical about the role of the state. No, strangely …Read More

  • Ordained by God by Douglas Kelly

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2004

    In the 1950s, a very popular song proclaimed “He’s got the whole world in his hands!” Insofar as it had any theological content, it presumably spoke of the beneficent control by the Lord of all that He has made …Read More

  • Objective Cultural Norms by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2004

    For Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), the principle of “all things to all men” was not a moral warrant for upholding cultural relativism. Instead, it was a practical mandate for upholding cultural norms. It was for him an inducement to communicate …Read More

  • Two Thumbs Down by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    Neil Postman, in his delightful albeit ominous book Amusing Ourselves to Death, draws an insightful comparison between two important dystopian novels. Utopian novels, of course, are those designed to show us edenic cultures. Dystopian novels show us hellish futures.Read More

  • The Soul-Shaping Reality of the Gospel: An Interview with David Wells by David Wells

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    TT: Besides the Bible, what has been the most influential book you have read this past year? DW: Most politicians answer a slightly different question from the one they have been asked, and so may I do so, too? The …Read More

  • The End of Soap Oprah by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    The passing of the Oprah Winfrey Show is surely worthy of being described with that most overworked of clichés, as “the end of an era.” Except, of course, it is not the end of an era so much as …Read More

  • Whitewashing History? by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011

    To borrow a phrase from Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, it is the best of times, the worst of times. That is how one might describe the current movie-saturated era. Certainly, from an entertainment perspective, it is the …Read More