• Civilization & Its Discontents by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    Sometimes the lofty are rather low. Paul in writing to the Corinthians enjoins them, and therefore us, to “destroy arguments and every lofty opinion raised against the knowledge of God.” Though the giddy optimism of our Enlightenment fathers has dimmed …Read More

  • The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    The Edict of Milan in A.D. 313 legalized Christianity. Toleration of this new faith in Rome was not a gradual development. It happened suddenly, right after some of the most brutal persecutions of Christians. Soon, Roman officials were kissing …Read More

  • Right Now Counts Forever by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2010

    It was Augustine who argued that every sin is a failure to love ordinately. Sin is the result of either loving something more than we ought or the result of loving something less than we ought. We are to love …Read More

  • Beacon of Holiness by Alistair Begg

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    If the Word does not dwell with power in us,” wrote Puritan John Owen, “it will not pass with power from us” (The Works of John Owen, vol. 16, p. 76.). This godly minister personified this truth in his personal …Read More

  • The Death of Pride by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    I once had a girlfriend who was a classic liberal. Don’t misunderstand. She wasn’t a classical liberal, that is, one with a profound desire for liberty, one who was skeptical about the role of the state. No, strangely …Read More

  • Ordained by God by Douglas Kelly

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2004

    In the 1950s, a very popular song proclaimed “He’s got the whole world in his hands!” Insofar as it had any theological content, it presumably spoke of the beneficent control by the Lord of all that He has made …Read More

  • Objective Cultural Norms by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2004

    For Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), the principle of “all things to all men” was not a moral warrant for upholding cultural relativism. Instead, it was a practical mandate for upholding cultural norms. It was for him an inducement to communicate …Read More

  • Two Thumbs Down by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    Neil Postman, in his delightful albeit ominous book Amusing Ourselves to Death, draws an insightful comparison between two important dystopian novels. Utopian novels, of course, are those designed to show us edenic cultures. Dystopian novels show us hellish futures.Read More

  • The End of Soap Oprah by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    The passing of the Oprah Winfrey Show is surely worthy of being described with that most overworked of clichés, as “the end of an era.” Except, of course, it is not the end of an era so much as …Read More

  • Whitewashing History? by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011

    To borrow a phrase from Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, it is the best of times, the worst of times. That is how one might describe the current movie-saturated era. Certainly, from an entertainment perspective, it is the …Read More

  • Nothing Like the Church by Robert Rayburn

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2011

    It should come as no surprise that in Western culture, triumphantly individualistic as it is, institutions tend to suffer in people’s estimations. Christians, shaped too much by this culture, predictably have a diminished appreciation even for their very own …Read More

  • Church Growth—Weaknesses to Watch by Os Guinness

    FROM TABLETALK | February 1992

    Like many movements, the church-growth movement is a grand mixture of things good, bad, and in-between. After stressing its significance last month, I will not comment further on its good parts—except to say that anything that “goes without saying …Read More

  • Adam & Eve Go to College by Stan Oakes

    Few understand the unique influence of the university; few understand that the university is in a grave crisis. Few understand that the consequence of ignoring this crisis is the demise of America as we know it.

    S.E. Kao

    Ten …Read More

  • Discerning the News by Sarah Bailey

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    It’s no secret that many Christians harbor deep skepticism of the “liberal media elite.” Some have been burned by the media, noting unfair or unfriendly coverage from the past. “I never just accept what newspapers say about people. I …Read More

  • Listening to the World by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2013

    Christians should listen to the Word of God, of course, in the sense of heeding it, following it, and taking it in. Listening to the competing voices of the world in that way can get us into trouble. But there …Read More