• Peter Waldo and the Waldensians by W. Robert Godfrey

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    By the twelfth century, the church in Western Europe was indeed powerful and impressive. In the emerging Gothic architecture, we can see something of the devotion of the people and the wealth of the bishops. In the developing scholastic theology …Read More

  • The Original Geneva Bible by Roger Nicole

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1995

    Christianity is the religion of the Incarnate Word, Jesus Christ, and of the written Word, the Bible. Wherever Christianity has gone, it has developed translations of Scripture as a necessity. The promise of Pentecost, where people of various origin heard …Read More

  • Forerunner of the Reformation by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2014

    John Wycliffe was the morning star of the Reformation. He was a protestant and a reformer more than a century before Martin Luther ignited the Protestant Reformation in 1517. Through Wycliffe, God planted the seeds of the Reformation, He watered …Read More

  • The Fourteenth Century by Nicholas Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2014

    The papacy had reached the zenith of its political power in Europe under Innocent III. His death in 1216 was followed by a period of eclipse and, finally, catastrophe. The popes continued to struggle for supremacy against Germany’s “Holy …Read More

  • The Morning Star of the Reformation by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2014

    He had been dead and buried for a few decades, but the church wanted to make a point. His remains were exhumed and burned, a fitting end for the “heretic” John Wycliffe. Wycliffe once explained what the letters in the …Read More

  • The Scottish Reformation by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    His name was Patrick Hamilton. He was born into nobility. His mother’s father was the second son of the king. As a young man of only thirteen, he was given a position of abbot, which supplied a handsome income …Read More

  • Scotland and the Birth of the United States by Donald Fortson

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    Scottish Presbyterianism, with its robust theology, disciplined government by elders, and strict piety, would significantly influence America through the waves of Scots-Irish immigrants that became the backbone of the Revolutionary era. Descended from lowland Scots, the Ulster Scots had begun …Read More

  • The Centrality of the Church by Sean Michael Lucas

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2014

    For those to whom [God] is Father the church may also be Mother,” John Calvin observed in his Institutes (4.1.1). A few paragraphs later, he teases out what this metaphor means. God uses the church to bring us …Read More

  • Forerunner of the Reformation by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2014

    John Wycliffe was the morning star of the Reformation. He was a protestant and a reformer more than a century before Martin Luther ignited the Protestant Reformation in 1517. Through Wycliffe, God planted the seeds of the Reformation, He watered …Read More

  • The Centrality of the Church by Sean Michael Lucas

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2014

    For those to whom [God] is Father the church may also be Mother,” John Calvin observed in his Institutes (4.1.1). A few paragraphs later, he teases out what this metaphor means. God uses the church to bring us …Read More

  • John Knox by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    It might be difficult for a visitor to Scotland in 2014 to believe that the nation was a backwater country five hundred years ago. In fact, however, one sixteenth-century writer could, without fear of contradiction, describe it as “a corner …Read More

  • The 13th Century by Nicholas Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2013

    More traditionally minded Roman Catholics have seen the thirteenth century as the golden age of Roman Catholic civilization. Certainly it witnessed the papacy achieving the summit of its power over the politics and culture of Western Europe. THE REIGN OF …Read More

  • Gospel Footprints by Erik Raymond

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    One of the cultural plagues of the twenty-first century is our historical illiteracy. The comedian Jay Leno capitalizes on this when he asks random questions to people. Leno’s “Jaywalking” skits demonstrate that regular Americans are not up to speed …Read More

  • The Benedictine Rule by Andrew Hoffecker

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2006

    Ever since the New Testament epistles were written, Christians have received advice on how to live the Christian life. How much should we pray? What progress can we expect to make in achieving biblical holiness in this life? Is perfection …Read More

  • The Morning Star of the Reformation by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2014

    He had been dead and buried for a few decades, but the church wanted to make a point. His remains were exhumed and burned, a fitting end for the “heretic” John Wycliffe. Wycliffe once explained what the letters in the …Read More