• Swimming the Tiber? by Mark Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2012

    The Roman Catholic Church poses several attractions for evangelical Christians. Whether their motivation is Rome’s apparent unifying power, its claims to be semper idem (“always the same”), its so-called historical pedigree, its ornate liturgy, or the belief that only …Read More

  • To Be Deep in History by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2010

    The nineteenth century witnessed the conversions of two prominent Anglican clergymen to Roman Catholicism. Both men would ultimately become cardinals in the Roman Church, and both men would profoundly influence Roman Catholic theology. The first was John Henry Newman (1801 …Read More

  • Daily Confession, Enduring Reform by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2010

    I have a friend who is a Roman Catholic. Not too long ago he went to “confession,” after which he told me, with tears welling up in his eyes, he felt “clean like a new born baby.” Confession is an …Read More

  • Setting the Stage: The First Millennium by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2010

    Volumes have been written giving detailed analyses of the extraordinary things that occurred in the first thousand years of church history, events that influenced everything that came after them. In this brief overview, I’m going to look at five …Read More

  • Making Molehills Out of Mountains by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2010

    The crisis regarding the doctrine of justification that provoked the Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century has not yet been resolved. Thus, the Reformation is by no means over. The dispute over justification that split the church back then threatens …Read More

  • The Anglican Way by Gerald Bray

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    The English Reformation produced the Book of Common Prayer and the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion as its foundational documents. Both represent the more Reformed (as opposed to Lutheran) phase of the English reformation, though they are closer to patristic and …Read More

  • The Reform of the English Church by Peter Toon

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    In America today “separation of church and state” is basic to both political and theological thinking. In contrast, in the sixteenth century in England the union of church and state was taken for granted as governed and guided by divine …Read More