The Church is One

Holy Father, keep them in your name, which you have given me, that they may be one, even as we are one” (Jn. 17:11b).

- John 17

Ephesians is often regarded as one of the best places to begin any study of the church because of its emphasis on the one people of God being knit together in Christ. Having been introduced in Ephesians 2:18-22 to the concept that the church is the Lord’s holy temple built upon the apostles and prophets, we have reached a good place to pause our study of this epistle and spend a few days looking at what the entire canon of Scripture has to say about the church. The Bride of Christ, a teaching series by Dr. R.C. Sproul, will guide our study of this important topic.

Let us begin by turning to John 17, which contains some of our Savior’s most focused teaching on the church and His desires for it. This instruction is expressed in our Lord’s High Priestly Prayer, the longest recorded prayer in the New Testament. Although Jesus articulates many things about His church in this chapter, there is a clear stress on the unity of His people, as He prays that His disciples and all those who come to believe because of their gospel proclamation would be one (vv. 11b, 22–23). Unfortunately, however, it seems that nothing but division exists in the church today. Hundreds of different Protestant denominations can be found throughout the world, including Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, Lutherans, Pentecostals, Anglicans, and many more.

Such visible disunity drives the ecumenical movement, an attempt to rectify the problem by finding agreement between Christians on matters of doctrine and practice. This goal is not in itself a bad one, as long as those participating in the dialogue agree on the fundamental tenets of Christianity. Yet it is often the case that the most eager and vocal proponents of ecumenism also have, at best, a tenuous affirmation of the creeds. What often results is a lowest-common-denominator religion void of the gospel and a refusal to hear what the Bible says on a whole host of matters in order that none might take offense.

Visible Christian unity is a good thing, and it is something toward which we should all strive. But visible unity is meaningless if it is not based on an invisible unity of Christians in the truth of God, as Jesus tells us (vv. 17–19). We do no one a favor if the gospel is not the tie that binds us together.

Coram Deo

Are you concerned for the unity of the church? Although we can never compromise on the essential truths of the gospel, striving toward reconciliation with other believers and the unity of the faith, both invisible and visible, is a commendable goal. Practical ways that our unity in Christ Jesus can be demonstrated include Christian conferences, community prayer meetings or Bible studies with other evangelical believers, and more.

Passages for Further Study

Amos 3:3
2 John 4

We Recommend

Permissions: You are permitted and encouraged to reproduce and distribute this material in any format provided that you do not alter the wording in any way, you do not charge a fee beyond the cost of reproduction, and you do not make more than 500 physical copies. For web posting, a link to this document on our website is preferred (where applicable). If no such link exists, simply link to www.ligonier.org.

Please include the following statement on any distributed copy: From Ligonier Ministries, the teaching fellowship of R.C. Sproul. All rights reserved. Website: www.ligonier.org | Phone: 1-800-435-4343