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  • Heresy of the Free Spirit by Kevin DeYoung

    Marguerite Porete was a French mystic born in the thirteenth century. She was part of the Beguines, a voluntary, informal, semi-monastic community not unlike the new monasticism popping up in some urban centers. Marguerite, though unknown to almost all contemporary …Read More

  • To Be Deep in History by Keith Mathison

    The nineteenth century witnessed the conversions of two prominent Anglican clergymen to Roman Catholicism. Both men would ultimately become cardinals in the Roman Church, and both men would profoundly influence Roman Catholic theology. The first was John Henry Newman (1801–1890). …Read More

  • A Supernatural Faith by R.C. Sproul

    The God hypothesis is no longer necessary to explain the origin of the universe or the development of human life.” This assertion was at the very heart of the movement that took place in the eighteenth century that we call …Read More

  • Pilgrims Who Make No Progress by Gene Edward Veith

    To describe life as a journey is such a perfect metaphor that writers in every age return to it again and again. Western culture is full of pilgrims, headed in different directions, to different destinations. Before John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, …Read More

  • The Rise of the Papacy by David Wells

    There are one billion Roman Catholics worldwide, one billion people who are subject to the Pope’s authority. How, one might ask, did all of this happen? The answer, I believe, is far more complex and untidy than Catholics have argued. …Read More

  • “The Greatest of All Protestant Heresies”? by Sinclair Ferguson

    Let us begin with a church history exam question. Cardinal Robert Bellarmine (1542–1621) was a figure not to be taken lightly. He was Pope Clement VIII’s personal theologian and one of the most able figures in the Counter-Reformation movement within …Read More

  • The National Denier: Fiction Stranger than the Truth! by S.M. Baugh

    It is strange, is it not, that perfectly rational, even brilliant people should believe the most untenable of fables but disbelieve the most believable of historical events? No, it is beyond strange: it is downright tragic, because to deny this …Read More

  • “If I Should Die Before I Wake …” by Harold Brown

    WHAT HAPPENS TO US AT DEATH? We know what happens to the body, but what happens to the soul? The materialist’s answer is simple: There is no such thing as a soul, so there is no hope of eternal life …Read More

  • Bubble Gum and the Trinity by Douglas Wilson

    I recently told a class of tenth-graders that what our culture needed was a return to Trinitarian bubble-gum commercials. They were a little nonplussed, and so I hastened to explain that as individuals with one set of ultimate commitments, we …Read More

  • A Rose Is a Rose by R.C. Sproul

    A rose is a rose is a rose. This dictum reinforces the adage that a rose by any other name is still a rose. The idea is that the essence of the rose is not conditioned by what name is …Read More

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