• Wily Jacob by Derek Thomas

    Sell me your birthright now,” Jacob demanded of his twin brother, Esau (Gen. 25:31). Thus begins the sorry tale of Abraham’s grandson. From the start, Jacob challenges us to dislike him: a self-willed, pampered child with ruthless skills in getting …Read More

  • Winning Back His Bride by Sam Storms

    This month is special to me and my wife, Ann. It was on May 26, 1972, that we stood in the presence of family, friends, and our heavenly Father and there pledged to one another to be faithful “till death …Read More

  • Wisdom and Foolishness by Harry Reeder

    Seldom in an assigned writing project is the author given an opportunity to address a theme that permeates Scripture, that is pervasive in both the Old and New Testament. But in this instance, my assignment provides for that and more, …Read More

  • Wisdom and Knowledge by R.C. Sproul

    In college, I majored in philosophy. On the very first day of the very first course that I took in philosophy, the professor wrote the word philosophy on the chalkboard, then broke it down to show its etymological origin. The …Read More

  • Wisely Handling the Bible’s Wise Sayings by R.C. Sproul

    Every culture seems to have its own unique, collected wisdom, pithy insights of the wise. Oftentimes, these tidbits of wisdom are preserved in the form of the proverb. We have proverbial sayings in American culture. I am thinking of sayings …Read More

  • With Great Joy by Chris Larson

    At the end of Jude’s epistle stand two verses that rival the most rapturous language found in Scripture. Tucked into verses 24–25 is a small phrase that should bring comfort to Christians who struggle with weak faith. We are told …Read More

  • With Heart and Mind by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    Reformed folk have not earned a reputation for hearts overflowing with love. We tend to be the cerebral ones, very careful to dot our theological I’s and cross our philosophical T’s. Given our peculiar gift, it is no small wonder …Read More

  • With Malice Aforethought by Kris Lundgaard

    When Genevieve told Liz she was wearing her blouse inside-out, Liz was mortified. The verb mortify comes from a Latin word for death, so it fits Liz: she wanted to die. Nowadays we rarely use the word in any other …Read More

  • With One Voice by Jack Kinneer

    English-speaking Christians around the world know the Lord’s Prayer in the wording of the King James Version (Matt. 6:9–13; Luke 11:2–4). Believers from diverse church traditions have this prayer in common and can recite it in unison. We are able …Read More

  • With Passion by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    One of the troubles with trouble is that it can encourage us toward selfishness. When things are going well for us, it is rather easy to feel magnanimous. When challenges come our way, however, suddenly we feel entitled to be …Read More

Topics