Ligonier Blog / Tuesday / October 21 / 2014

Latest from R.C. Sproul

  • Hedonism: “Grabbing for All the Gusto!” (pt. 3)

    from R.C. Sproul Apr 01, 2009 Category: Articles

    "If It Feels Good, Is It Good?"
    Hedonism makes a value judgment by saying that the avoidance of pain and the pursuit of pleasure are good. At the same time, it produces a system of ethics which, in turn, produces a certain behavioral pattern of morality. A popular maxim of our culture is "If it feels good, it is good." Goodness is determined by feeling. Popular music communicates the message that the final test of what is right is the feeling test. Keep Reading
  • Hedonism: “Grabbing for All the Gusto!” (pt. 2)

    from R.C. Sproul Mar 31, 2009 Category: Articles

    Stoics: Seeking Peace of Mind
    In addition, the Epicureans searched for the same thing that the Stoics sought, but they approached it in a completely different manner. The goal of Epicurean philosophy was the achievement of peace of mind. This quest was not unique to the Epicureans. Doesn't everyone want peace of mind? The answer is obvious, but how does one obtain it? The Stoics felt that the only way to find peace of mind was by adopting a philosophy they called "imperturbability." That means you don't let anything bother you. You adopt a "stoical attitude" toward all things. You do not get emotionally involved, you do not get your hopes up, nor do you let your hopes down, but you maintain an emotional state of equilibrium where nothing bothers you. You adopt a detached feeling toward those things over which you have no control. Keep Reading
  • Hedonism: “Grabbing for All the Gusto!” (pt. 1)

    from R.C. Sproul Mar 30, 2009 Category: Articles

      Some Americans have never heard the word hedonism but few have not experienced the impact of the philosophy of hedonism on their lives. As a world view, hedonism has as its basic principle the belief that the good and the evil are defined in terms of pleasure and pain. Man's ultimate purpose for living is to be found in enjoying pleasure and avoiding pain. The hedonist's constant goal in life is to pursue those things which increase pleasure and decrease pain. Keep Reading
  • The Divine Foundation of Authority

    from R.C. Sproul Mar 11, 2009 Category: Articles

    "You're out!" "I'm safe!" "Out!" "Safe!" "Out!" "It's my ball, and it's my bat, and I say that I'm safe." This is how we settled disputes over plays in our pickup baseball games played without the benefit of a referee or umpire. When a disputed play could not be resolved through reason or through yelling, the one who possessed the equipment usually determined the outcome. It was a child's game in which might made right. It was the nascent expression of the cynical statement: "He who owns the gold, rules." Keep Reading
  • Book Review: Christless Christianity

    from R.C. Sproul Mar 03, 2009 Category: Articles

    In his recent book, Christless Christianity, Dr. Michael Horton has analyzed the problems that assail the contemporary evangelical church community. Leaning heavily upon the research of sociologists of religion such as James Davidson Hunter, and others, Horton has been able accurately to pin the tail on the evangelical donkey. Keep Reading
  • Pluralism and Relativism: “It’s All Relative” (pt. 3)

    from R.C. Sproul Feb 21, 2009 Category: Articles

    One of the most controversial issues of our day is that of abortion. It is tearing this country apart politically, economically, socially, and in every other way. Legislation is pending in every statehouse over the question of abortion. The issue is not whether or not it is all right to have an abortion if a person is subjected to rape or if the mother's life is in danger. Those are moral questions that theologians and students of ethics work with. The issue today is over the question of abortion on demand. Keep Reading
  • Pluralism and Relativism: “It’s All Relative” (pt. 2)

    from R.C. Sproul Feb 20, 2009 Category: Articles

    In the twentieth century, the buzz word that replaced evolution was relativity. We are all aware of the changes in our lives that have been brought about by the scientific revolution based on Einstein's theory of relativity. This is the atomic age. Our lives have been changed by the threat of nuclear war as well as by new possibilities of power from nuclear energy that exist as a result of Einstein's work. Keep Reading
  • Pluralism and Relativism: “It’s All Relative” (pt. 1)

    from R.C. Sproul Feb 19, 2009 Category: Articles

    As missionaries attempting to understand the way of thinking in our culture, we must turn our attention to twin topics under the umbrella heading of secularism--pluralism and relativism. Let us think once more of the high wall we examined earlier, the wall representing the line of demarcation separating the present time from the eternal world. It is the barrier to the transcendent realm of unity, the wall that confines and restricts us to this time and this place. Keep Reading
  • Pessimistic Existentialism (pt. 4)

    from R.C. Sproul Feb 12, 2009 Category: Articles

    Here we see the vivid contrast between pessimistic existentialism and Christianity. Christianity also features a ringing call to courage. The most frequent negative prohibition found in the New Testament comes from the lips of Jesus--"Fear not!" This command is given so often by Christ that it almost seems like a greeting. One gets the impression that virtually every time Jesus appears to His disciples, He begins the conversation by saying, "Fear not." Keep Reading
  • Pessimistic Existentialism (pt. 3)

    from R.C. Sproul Feb 11, 2009 Category: Articles

    European films, such as those of Ingmar Bergman, Antonini, and Fellini have communicated some of the motifs of existentialism. The "theater of the absurd," a phenomenon that began in France in the 1950s and came to Broadway in the 1960s, was another vehicle of existentialism. The theater of the absurd gained prominence with Samuel Beckett's play, Waiting for Godot. In this play, two vagrants pass the time while waiting for the unidentified Godot. But Godot never arrives. Godot is a thinly veiled characterization of God. The idea is that modern man lives in the absence of God. He waits for God, but God never shows up. Keep Reading

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