Ligonier Blog / Tuesday / September 23 / 2014

Latest from R.C. Sproul

  • The Christian and Science (pt. 3)

    from R.C. Sproul Apr 17, 2009 Category: Articles

    There is a sense in which the Christian should be the most passionate scientist of all because he should be rigorously open to truth wherever it is found. He should not be afraid that a new discovery of something that is true will destroy his foundation for truth. If our foundation for truth is true, all other truth can only support it and enhance it. It can't destroy it. Therefore, Christians ought not to be afraid of scientific inquiry. This does not mean that we should uncritically accept all pronouncements and pontifications of scientists. Scientists are fallible and may occasionally make arrogant statements that go far beyond the realm of their own expertise. Keep Reading
  • The Christian and Science (pt. 2)

    from R.C. Sproul Apr 16, 2009 Category: Articles

    Many Protestant scholars venture earlier into church history and lay the blame for this division at the feet of Saint Thomas Aquinas. Among Protestant thinkers, there seems to be a kind of allergy to the work of Aquinas. Francis Schaeffer, for example, is one who would lay much of the blame for today's schizophrenic view on Aquinas. Schaeffer argued that the root of modern man's trauma lies in the separation that Aquinas made between the realms of nature and grace. The realm of nature is the daily arena of his visible world, the scientific inquiry. The realm of grace is the supernatural realm of God. If Aquinas did in fact separate nature and grace, then certainly Dr. Schaeffer would be correct in pointing the finger at Saint Thomas for causing a significant part of modern man's dilemma. I plead for Aquinas, that he was not guilty of the charge. Aquinas did everything in his power to prevent a separation of nature and grace. He labored tirelessly to combat the efforts of philosophers who were making such a separation. Let us briefly consider the historical background. Keep Reading
  • The Christian and Science (pt. 1)

    from R.C. Sproul Apr 15, 2009 Category: Articles

    What is the Christian's role in the scientific enterprise? How do we as Christians live in a culture that has been shaped and influenced by the impact of scientific accomplishments? Keep Reading
  • He Is Risen!

    from R.C. Sproul Apr 12, 2009 Category: Articles

    Here is the watershed of human history where the misery of the race is transformed into grandeur. Here the kerygma, the proclamation of the early church, was born with the cry "He is risen." We can view this event as a symbol, a lovely tale of hope. We can reduce it to a moralism that declares, as one preacher put it, "The meaning of the Resurrection is that we can face the dawn of each new day with dialectical courage." Keep Reading
  • The Word of God in the Hands of Man

    from R.C. Sproul Apr 08, 2009 Category: Articles

    It was many years ago when my grandmother related to me games that she played as a little girl in the 1880s. One game she mentioned was one that she and her Methodist girlfriends played with their Roman Catholic friends. In a playful jest of the words of the Mass, my grandmother would say, "Tommy and Johnny went down to the river to play dominoes." Here the word dominoes was a play on the use of the term Domine that occurred so frequently in the Catholic rite of the Mass. The children, of course, were revealing their lack of knowledge of the words of the Mass because they were spoken in Latin. Keep Reading
  • Hedonism: “Grabbing for All the Gusto!” (pt. 3)

    from R.C. Sproul Apr 01, 2009 Category: Articles

    "If It Feels Good, Is It Good?"
    Hedonism makes a value judgment by saying that the avoidance of pain and the pursuit of pleasure are good. At the same time, it produces a system of ethics which, in turn, produces a certain behavioral pattern of morality. A popular maxim of our culture is "If it feels good, it is good." Goodness is determined by feeling. Popular music communicates the message that the final test of what is right is the feeling test. Keep Reading
  • Hedonism: “Grabbing for All the Gusto!” (pt. 2)

    from R.C. Sproul Mar 31, 2009 Category: Articles

    Stoics: Seeking Peace of Mind
    In addition, the Epicureans searched for the same thing that the Stoics sought, but they approached it in a completely different manner. The goal of Epicurean philosophy was the achievement of peace of mind. This quest was not unique to the Epicureans. Doesn't everyone want peace of mind? The answer is obvious, but how does one obtain it? The Stoics felt that the only way to find peace of mind was by adopting a philosophy they called "imperturbability." That means you don't let anything bother you. You adopt a "stoical attitude" toward all things. You do not get emotionally involved, you do not get your hopes up, nor do you let your hopes down, but you maintain an emotional state of equilibrium where nothing bothers you. You adopt a detached feeling toward those things over which you have no control. Keep Reading
  • Hedonism: “Grabbing for All the Gusto!” (pt. 1)

    from R.C. Sproul Mar 30, 2009 Category: Articles

      Some Americans have never heard the word hedonism but few have not experienced the impact of the philosophy of hedonism on their lives. As a world view, hedonism has as its basic principle the belief that the good and the evil are defined in terms of pleasure and pain. Man's ultimate purpose for living is to be found in enjoying pleasure and avoiding pain. The hedonist's constant goal in life is to pursue those things which increase pleasure and decrease pain. Keep Reading
  • The Divine Foundation of Authority

    from R.C. Sproul Mar 11, 2009 Category: Articles

    "You're out!" "I'm safe!" "Out!" "Safe!" "Out!" "It's my ball, and it's my bat, and I say that I'm safe." This is how we settled disputes over plays in our pickup baseball games played without the benefit of a referee or umpire. When a disputed play could not be resolved through reason or through yelling, the one who possessed the equipment usually determined the outcome. It was a child's game in which might made right. It was the nascent expression of the cynical statement: "He who owns the gold, rules." Keep Reading
  • Book Review: Christless Christianity

    from R.C. Sproul Mar 03, 2009 Category: Articles

    In his recent book, Christless Christianity, Dr. Michael Horton has analyzed the problems that assail the contemporary evangelical church community. Leaning heavily upon the research of sociologists of religion such as James Davidson Hunter, and others, Horton has been able accurately to pin the tail on the evangelical donkey. Keep Reading

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