Ligonier Blog / Tuesday / November 25 / 2014

Latest from R.C. Sproul

  • God’s Will and Your Marriage (pt. 1)

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 16, 2009 Category: Articles

    Perhaps in no other area of human activity do Christians expend more decision-making energy than in the area of marriage. No wonder, since the decisions relevant to the marital relationship have such far-reaching effects on our lives. How a person feels about his marital status determines, in large part, his sense of fulfillment, his productivity, and his self-image. The reality and the seriousness of the marital relationship are brought home when we realize that the one who knows us most intimately; the one before whom we are the most fragile and vulnerable; and the one who powerfully shapes and influences our lives--this one is none other than our marriage partner. That is why entering into the marital relationship is not something anyone should take lightly. Keep Reading
  • Longing for Fellowship

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 12, 2009 Category: Articles

    We speak of God as the immortal, invisible, all-wise God. This string of attributes gives some comfort and no small amount of dismay. Keep Reading
  • The Theologian

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 08, 2009 Category: Articles

    Thinkers in the ancient world sought to plumb the depths of ultimate reality. With that quest for ultimate reality came the birth of the discipline of philosophy. Some philosophers focused on one particular aspect of philosophy called metaphysics (ultimate being). Others focused their attention on epistemology (the science of knowing). Still others stressed in their investigation the basic principles and elements of ethics (the study of the good and the right). And others focused on the ultimate foundations for aesthetics (the study of the beautiful). One philosopher stood out as being deeply involved in the study of all of these matters as well as others. Keep Reading
  • Recreating the Tower of Babel

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 05, 2009 Category: Articles

    There are church buildings that are designed to give no hint of the building's true purpose as a house of worship. They're built to look more like town meeting halls. The chancel is no longer called the chancel, it's called the stage. The pulpit is not called a pulpit, it's called a lectern, and the congregation isn't called a congregation, but it's called an audience. Part of this is a desire to break through the old traditions that people have become inoculated against and no longer want any part of. In at least some cases, it is due to an abiding antipathy to beauty in worship, based on a desire to avoid an empty form of worship that is merely external. The church wants to exhibit that worship comes from the heart, not from external stimuli. Keep Reading
  • The Sense of Touch in Worship

    from R.C. Sproul Jun 28, 2009 Category: Articles

    Years ago, I spoke at a service at a large church in California. After I finished preaching, the associate pastor invited everyone who would like to have prayer to come forward to the long kneeling bench across the front of the sanctuary, and seventy-five or eighty people responded. The minister then gave a closing prayer, but as he prayed he walked along the bench and touched each person on the head very gently. I thought, "This is remarkable. This is a recovery, in a sense, of the ancient tradition of having a physical touch that is a part of the worship service." Keep Reading
  • God’s Will and Your Job (pt. 4)

    from R.C. Sproul Jun 27, 2009 Category: Articles

    In addition to the inner call of God, we recognize that there is such a thing as an external call to labor, a call that comes from people who request our services for their particular mission or purpose. We may be called by the church to be preachers or by a company to be foremen or shippers. Every time an organization places a want ad in a newspaper, a human call is going out for able workers to come and match their gifts and talents to a presented need. Keep Reading
  • God’s Will and Your Job (pt. 3)

    from R.C. Sproul Jun 26, 2009 Category: Articles

    Let us extend the concept of service and obedience to the analogy of human warfare. A crisis besets a nation, and people are summoned in the cause of national defense. Leaving the security and comfort of their homes and jobs, they make sacrifices by enlisting in the armed services. Are not Christians called to do the same? Certainly there is a sense in which we are. Yet within the context of the earthly military, there are a vast number of jobs, some for which we would be suited and others for which we would not. Some military tasks would be in line with our motivated skills and patterns of behavior while others would be completely at odds with our motivated skills and behavior. Even within the context of sacrificial service, consideration of motivation is a vital ingredient in determining our vocation. Keep Reading
  • God’s Will and Your Job (pt. 2)

    from R.C. Sproul Jun 25, 2009 Category: Articles

    The question of vocation becomes a crisis at two major points in life. The first is in late adolescence when a person is pressured into deciding what skills and knowledge he should acquire for future use. Some college freshmen feel pressured to declare a major in their first year, before knowing the available options and the limits of their ability. Keep Reading
  • God’s Will and Your Job (pt. 1)

    from R.C. Sproul Jun 24, 2009 Category: Articles

    When we are introduced to people, the following three questions are generally asked: What is your name? Where are you from? What do you do? The third question is the one that concerns us in this chapter. Keep Reading
  • The Nadir of Arrogance

    from R.C. Sproul Jun 21, 2009 Category: Articles

    Just as with the issue of instrumentation, there is controversy regarding the issue of singing in worship. The controversy erupts when we ask what types of songs are appropriate for use in the context of worship. Most of us would agree that what we want in worship is good music, not bad music. However, for some people, "good" music means classical and traditional music, while for others it means contemporary music. Keep Reading

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