Ligonier Blog / Wednesday / October 1 / 2014

Latest from R.C. Sproul

  • Developing a Passion for God

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 29, 2009 Category: Articles

    I remember a stained-glass window that adorned the library of my alma mater. It was situated above the stairwell at the second-floor landing. In leaded letters, the words in the window declared, "Knowledge is power." Keep Reading
  • The Presence of Christ

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 26, 2009 Category: Articles

    The Heidelberg Catechism states, in the answer to Question 47, "Christ is true man and true God. With respect to His human nature He is no longer on earth, but with respect to His divinity, majesty, grace, and Spirit He is never absent from us." This statement tried to do justice to Jesus' own teaching before He left this planet. Keep Reading
  • Buried with Christ

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 19, 2009 Category: Articles

    What does Paul mean when he talks about filling up that which is lacking in the afflictions of Christ if there is no deficiency of merit in Christ's suffering? Christ, Who performs the perfect sacrifice once and for all, nevertheless calls His church to bear witness to His suffering until He returns, and there is still a measure of suffering that must take place in the history of redemption. This suffering will not add anything to Christ's merit. Our suffering doesn't atone for anybody's sin, certainly not for our own, but God's redemptive historical plan has to be finished, and that plan includes the afflictions of the people of God. Paul, being acutely conscious of that, spoke of his filling up the agenda of suffering, and you and I must do the same. Keep Reading
  • God’s Will and Your Marriage (pt. 3)

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 18, 2009 Category: Articles

    Many people resent the suggestion that they seek counsel in their selection of a marriage partner. After all, isn't such a selection an intensely personal and private matter? However personal and private the decision might be, it is one of grave importance to the future of the couple and their potential offspring, their families, and their friends. Keep Reading
  • God’s Will and Your Marriage (pt. 2)

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 17, 2009 Category: Articles

    Paul states in 1 Corinthians 7:8-9: "To the unmarried and widows I say that it is well for them to remain single as I do. But if they cannot exercise self-control, they should marry. For it is better to marry than to be aflame with passion." The distinction is between the good and the better. Here Paul introduces the idea of burning, not of the punitive fires of hell, but of the passions of the biological nature, which God has given us. Paul is speaking very candidly when he points out that some people are not made for celibacy. Marriage is a perfectly honorable and legitimate option even for those who are most strongly motivated by sexual fulfillment and relief from sexual temptation and passion. Keep Reading
  • God’s Will and Your Marriage (pt. 1)

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 16, 2009 Category: Articles

    Perhaps in no other area of human activity do Christians expend more decision-making energy than in the area of marriage. No wonder, since the decisions relevant to the marital relationship have such far-reaching effects on our lives. How a person feels about his marital status determines, in large part, his sense of fulfillment, his productivity, and his self-image. The reality and the seriousness of the marital relationship are brought home when we realize that the one who knows us most intimately; the one before whom we are the most fragile and vulnerable; and the one who powerfully shapes and influences our lives--this one is none other than our marriage partner. That is why entering into the marital relationship is not something anyone should take lightly. Keep Reading
  • Longing for Fellowship

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 12, 2009 Category: Articles

    We speak of God as the immortal, invisible, all-wise God. This string of attributes gives some comfort and no small amount of dismay. Keep Reading
  • The Theologian

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 08, 2009 Category: Articles

    Thinkers in the ancient world sought to plumb the depths of ultimate reality. With that quest for ultimate reality came the birth of the discipline of philosophy. Some philosophers focused on one particular aspect of philosophy called metaphysics (ultimate being). Others focused their attention on epistemology (the science of knowing). Still others stressed in their investigation the basic principles and elements of ethics (the study of the good and the right). And others focused on the ultimate foundations for aesthetics (the study of the beautiful). One philosopher stood out as being deeply involved in the study of all of these matters as well as others. Keep Reading
  • Recreating the Tower of Babel

    from R.C. Sproul Jul 05, 2009 Category: Articles

    There are church buildings that are designed to give no hint of the building's true purpose as a house of worship. They're built to look more like town meeting halls. The chancel is no longer called the chancel, it's called the stage. The pulpit is not called a pulpit, it's called a lectern, and the congregation isn't called a congregation, but it's called an audience. Part of this is a desire to break through the old traditions that people have become inoculated against and no longer want any part of. In at least some cases, it is due to an abiding antipathy to beauty in worship, based on a desire to avoid an empty form of worship that is merely external. The church wants to exhibit that worship comes from the heart, not from external stimuli. Keep Reading
  • The Sense of Touch in Worship

    from R.C. Sproul Jun 28, 2009 Category: Articles

    Years ago, I spoke at a service at a large church in California. After I finished preaching, the associate pastor invited everyone who would like to have prayer to come forward to the long kneeling bench across the front of the sanctuary, and seventy-five or eighty people responded. The minister then gave a closing prayer, but as he prayed he walked along the bench and touched each person on the head very gently. I thought, "This is remarkable. This is a recovery, in a sense, of the ancient tradition of having a physical touch that is a part of the worship service." Keep Reading

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