Ligonier Blog / Wednesday / October 22 / 2014

Latest from R.C. Sproul Jr.

  • Plowing in Hope

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Jun 22, 2009 Category: Articles

    The kingdom of God is at war. The promise from the beginning was that the seed of the woman, our King, would come and crush the head of the seed of the serpent (Gen. 3:15). Jesus' first step out of the tomb at Gethsemane crushed that ancient and wily serpent's head, and from that time forward we, the bride of Christ, created to be a help suitable for our Husband in His dominion calling, have been engaged in what theologians call a "mopping up" operation. The enemy has been defeated, but he doesn't yet have the sense to give up. Keep Reading
  • The Gnostic Ghosts That Haunt Us

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Jun 02, 2009 Category: Articles

    I was reminded this afternoon of a liturgy within a liturgy that I practice. My two youngest daughters, Erin Claire and Maili had their first dance recital. They are a part of a small ballet group made up of homeschooled little girls in our broader community. They danced beautifully, received their applause, smiled as only little girls can, and came and sat beside me, giving and receiving hugs. The entire rest of the family was there to cheer them on. The second dance troupe was a little older, and they danced to Pachelbel's Canon in D. As they danced I glanced over at my eleven year old daughter Shannon, smiling joyfully as she took in both the music and dancing. She sat there in her wheelchair and rejoiced. Keep Reading
  • Love Letters

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. May 26, 2009 Category: Articles

    It is a strange habit, though I am often caught in its grip. Why is it, I wonder, that we find ourselves so often longing for those days of the early church? Where did we begin to confuse the descriptive with the prescriptive, using what was the church once upon a time as a guide to what the church should be in our own day? The source of this foolishness is likely more Rousseau and likely less the Bible. Rousseau was the father of the modern Romantic movement who argued that man is basically good and that it is the debilitating effects of culture that always make things worse. The more primitive we can get, the better off we will be. Buying into that template, we find the early church to be our ideal. Keep Reading
  • Is It Fitting for We Who Are Calvinists to Adopt the Theology of a Man, and One Who Murdered Servetus?

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. May 08, 2009 Category: Articles

    As my friend Doug Phillips has pointed out, this year has brought, in the providence of God, a strange confluence of anniversaries. The two men who have had the greatest impact on these United States may well be, on the one hand, Charles Darwin, and on the other John Calvin. Darwin was born two hundred years ago this year, Calvin five hundred years ago. Our perspective on each of these men will serve as a potent bell-weather for our perspectives on a whole host of issues. Keep Reading
  • Beauty and the Best

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Apr 23, 2009 Category: Articles

    There is a tension among the people of God that reflects a delicate balance to which the Bible calls us. Paul, you will recall, argued that in his passion for the gospel, he wished to be all things to all people, that by all means some might be saved 
(1 Cor. 9:22). On the other hand, Jesus tells the disciples that when they brought the good news and were not received, they were to wipe the dust off of their feet as they left the town (Luke 9:5). They're both legitimate perspectives on the lost. Where, we wonder, does earnestly contending for lost souls end and pandering to the lost begin? Keep Reading
  • Should a Christian Become Good Friends (Not Just an Acquaintance) with Pagans?

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Apr 20, 2009 Category: Articles

    The Apostle Paul writes to the church at Corinth "Do not be bound together with unbelievers; for what partnership have righteousness and lawlessness, or what fellowship has light with darkness?" (2 Cor. 6:14). The text at least ought to raise the question in our minds. Would Paul's admonition here preclude close, personal friendships with those outside the kingdom? To answer properly we need only to answer this question- is such a friendship being bound together? Is it a partnership? Is it fellowship? Keep Reading
  • Who Says?

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Mar 27, 2009 Category: Articles

    It is a rather tedious and tiresome thing to pull the legs out from under our national confession. Our creed is not just internally inconsistent, it is not just incomprehensible, it is both these things rather quickly. That is, you do not start out with the fundamental premise, build a string of thirty or so syllogisms and come to a conclusion that contradicts the premise. You start with A, blink, and non-A is staring you right in the face. Our national creed is this- There is no such thing as true and false. The refutation is this- is it true or false that there's no such thing as true or false? It's over already. As I already noted, this devastating critique is by this point both tedious and tiresome. Potent and compelling, yes, but still boring as soggy graham crackers. Keep Reading
  • Our Propensity for Ego

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Mar 15, 2009 Category: Articles

    If we would seek to preach to the mind, we also must encourage those in our hearing to receive the Word preached with their minds. The habits of their hearts will be shaped by the habits of their minds. If, strangely, they listen only to check the preacher's level of orthodoxy, if they seek only to have their intellects tickled, if they attend to preaching only that they might show forth their own erudition, it is not their minds but their egos that are not being preached to. Just as a deep and complex sermon, rather than a simple and straightforward one, can be a sign of a preacher getting in the way, a deep and complex analysis of a sermon by the adept layman can be a sign of a congregant getting in the way. Our minds always need to be exhorted to beware our propensity for ego. Keep Reading
  • Believing God: 12 Promises Christians Struggle to Accept

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Feb 27, 2009 Category: Ligonier Resources

    A passion to see Christians take God at His word inspired Dr. R. C. Sproul Jr. to write Believing God: Twelve Biblical Promises Christians Struggle to Accept, the latest release from Reformation Trust Publishing. Keep Reading
  • The Good News

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Feb 17, 2009 Category: Articles

    I've got great news -- I just saved a bundle on my car insurance. This pop-cultural punchline might just expose a real problem we have in our Christian sub-culture: we don't know what the good news is. The confusion, from one perspective, is understandable. God is good. God is gracious. We move from grace to grace, receiving gifts from Him all the time. God is in turn sovereign. He controls all things. When He tells us, therefore, that all things work together for good for those who love Him, who have been called according to His purpose (Rom. 8:28), we can learn that it's all good news. His coming, that's good news. His dying, that's good news. His ascending, that's good news. His sending the Spirit, that's good news. The Spirit applying all these things to His people, that's good news. Even the trials we go through here and now, they are good news as well. We are, after all, to count it all joy. Keep Reading

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