Ligonier Blog / Tuesday / September 23 / 2014

Latest from R.C. Sproul Jr.

  • Is Sola Scriptura in the Bible?

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Nov 05, 2009 Category: Tabletalk Magazine

    No, and yes. The Bible does not have specific text that suggests that the Bible alone is our final authority in all matters of faith and practice. Those who delight to point this out, however, typically Roman Catholics and the eastern Orthodox, typically miss the point. Keep Reading
  • The Coming Kingdom

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Oct 27, 2009 Category: Articles

    The world is full of hypocrites, and the solution to this problem is twofold: If you are more modern, you deal with the gap between your obedience and what you pretend to be by trying harder to be good. You try to make your sin go away. If you are postmodern, you deal with the problem not by trying to do better, by getting rid of your sin, but by getting rid of the idea of sin. If there is no right and wrong, no one can rightly accuse you of acting like you are right when you are actually wrong. Keep Reading
  • Cornerstones and Stumbling Blocks

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Sep 18, 2009 Category: Articles

    Why do the wicked flee when none pursue? Guilt. Why do we by nature exchange the glory of the Creator for corruptible things? Guilt. Why do the nations rage, and the rulers take counsel together? Guilt. Why do the sheep know their Master's voice? Forgiveness. Why do the redeemed worship in Spirit and in truth? Forgiveness. Why have we been made into a royal priesthood, and a holy nation? Forgiveness. Eschatologically, what separates sheep and goats is eternity in heaven and eternity in hell. Here in the not yet, what separates us is living today in heaven and living today in hell. Keep Reading
  • For All the Saints

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Sep 14, 2009 Category: Articles

    Seek Ye First Unity matters. However, so does diversity. Indeed, unity and diversity unite in the very nature of God. God is three persons united in one essence. The world around us fails to see how God's creation reflects the Trinity, and it always therefore either veers toward the imposition of the one or the disintegration of the many. It either blurs or destroys distinctives in the first case, or in the second, it fragments because, in the words of T.S. Eliot, the center cannot hold. It either dies the death of a single tone, or death by cacophony. Keep Reading
  • Money from Nothing

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Aug 19, 2009 Category: Articles

    I'm connected to royalty. Granted, it's a rather thin point of union. In less than six degrees, though through enough marriage links that there is no legal tie, I am connected with the king of the tropical island, Yap. Yap is best known not for its sandy beaches nor its pineapple harvest, but for its money. They do not traffic there in sea shells. Neither is their money pure gold. Instead their coinage is great wheel-shaped stones that are hollow in the middle, some as tall as a coconut tree. What can we learn from this about the people of Yap? First, that they are not given to hasty exchanges. It takes a commitment to trade goods and services for stones. As cumbersome as barter can be, it's likely more easy than rolling a ton of rock down to the local bank. Second, while neither thieves nor robbers are apt to make off with the booty, it is likewise likely that there isn't a great deal of foreign trade. That is, not many outside of Yap would want this money. Keep Reading
  • The Great Divorce

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Aug 11, 2009 Category: Articles

    A month or so ago I wrote about GK Chesterton, and in particular his book Orthodoxy, in a little piece titled The Wizard of Ahhs. Like most people before I met Chesterton I met Lewis. I remember whose house I was in (it belonged to a family on staff at the old Ligonier Valley Study Center), which room I was in (the guest bedroom, this family was looking after me for the night) and where I was in that room, (near the door, in a sleeping bag) when I first read Lewis. It was The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. I was hooked. I read, of course, the rest of Narnia. I read the Space Trilogy. (That Hideous Strength remains my favorite work of fiction and will one day be covered here.) Then I read Mere Christianity, and promptly decided that Lewis should stick to fiction. I didn't, and don't care for that classic work, though I haven't yet discerned why. Likely it is a severe character flaw in me. Keep Reading
  • Where Is the Glory Found?

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Jul 24, 2009 Category: Articles

    As birthdays go, it's a big one. It is fitting and appropriate that we would mark the five-hundredth anniversary of the birth of John Calvin. Trouble is, that occasion is being marked in at least two different ways. First, those who do not find Calvin to their liking will seek to paint the man as a sour-faced, power-mad, fundamentalist and extremist. The ghost of Servetus will be forced to dance for us once more, and those of us who are grateful for Calvin will be encouraged to repent for our stubborn ways. Keep Reading
  • Plowing in Hope

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Jun 22, 2009 Category: Articles

    The kingdom of God is at war. The promise from the beginning was that the seed of the woman, our King, would come and crush the head of the seed of the serpent (Gen. 3:15). Jesus' first step out of the tomb at Gethsemane crushed that ancient and wily serpent's head, and from that time forward we, the bride of Christ, created to be a help suitable for our Husband in His dominion calling, have been engaged in what theologians call a "mopping up" operation. The enemy has been defeated, but he doesn't yet have the sense to give up. Keep Reading
  • The Gnostic Ghosts That Haunt Us

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Jun 02, 2009 Category: Articles

    I was reminded this afternoon of a liturgy within a liturgy that I practice. My two youngest daughters, Erin Claire and Maili had their first dance recital. They are a part of a small ballet group made up of homeschooled little girls in our broader community. They danced beautifully, received their applause, smiled as only little girls can, and came and sat beside me, giving and receiving hugs. The entire rest of the family was there to cheer them on. The second dance troupe was a little older, and they danced to Pachelbel's Canon in D. As they danced I glanced over at my eleven year old daughter Shannon, smiling joyfully as she took in both the music and dancing. She sat there in her wheelchair and rejoiced. Keep Reading

Subscribe

Categories