Ligonier Blog / Monday / September 15 / 2014

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  • Divine Immutability and the Doctrines of Grace (pt. 4)

    from John MacArthur May 08, 2009 Category: Articles

    Second Timothy 1:9 introduces us to the answer. Speaking of God, the verse says that He "saved us and called us to a holy calling, not because of our works but because of his own purpose and grace, which he gave us in Christ Jesus before the ages began." The phrase before the ages began is the English translation of the same Greek phrase rendered with the same words in Titus 1:2. Here, too, it literally means "before time began." In eternity past, before the dawn of history, God made the irrevocable decision to grant salvation to the redeemed. This is the promise of Titus 1:2, and it is a promise that God made according to His own independent purpose and grace. Put simply, it was a promise He made to Himself. Keep Reading
  • Is It Fitting for We Who Are Calvinists to Adopt the Theology of a Man, and One Who Murdered Servetus?

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. May 08, 2009 Category: Articles

    As my friend Doug Phillips has pointed out, this year has brought, in the providence of God, a strange confluence of anniversaries. The two men who have had the greatest impact on these United States may well be, on the one hand, Charles Darwin, and on the other John Calvin. Darwin was born two hundred years ago this year, Calvin five hundred years ago. Our perspective on each of these men will serve as a potent bell-weather for our perspectives on a whole host of issues. Keep Reading
  • Divine Immutability and the Doctrines of Grace (pt. 3)

    from John MacArthur May 07, 2009 Category: Articles

    Though the doctrine of election applies to all that God does in a general sense, it most often refers, in a specific New Testament sense, to the election of sinners to become redeemed saints within the church. Divine election, in this particular regard, speaks of God's independent and predetermined choice of those whom He would save and place into the corporate body of Christ. God did not save certain sinners because they chose Him, but because He chose them. Keep Reading
  • Viewing Calvin at the Bottom of a Deep Well

    from Keith Mathison May 06, 2009 Category: Articles

    The nineteenth-century Roman Catholic theologian George Tyrrell once criticized Adolf von Harnack's liberal view of Jesus in these now famous words: "The Christ that Harnack sees, looking back through nineteen centuries of Catholic darkness, is only the reflection of a Liberal Protestant face, seen at the bottom of a deep well." In other words, nineteenth-century liberals projected their own values and ideals onto Jesus and then used this man-made Jesus to support those values and ideals. Keep Reading
  • Complacent Repentance

    from Burk Parsons May 06, 2009 Category: Articles

    I love to hear stories about our faithful forefathers in ages past, and while it may be mere legend, I have heard that the great nineteenth-century British pastor Charles Spurgeon posted a sign on the door of his study. Each time he passed through the door of his study he could not avoid seeing the sign, which read: "Perhaps today." It was his way of reminding himself that Jesus could return any day. So Spurgeon lived, prayed, and preached -- eagerly and expectantly. Keep Reading
  • Divine Immutability and the Doctrines of Grace (pt. 2)

    from John MacArthur May 05, 2009 Category: Articles

    The idea that God does what He wants, and that what He does is true and right because He does it, is foundational to our understanding of everything in Scripture, including the doctrine of election. Keep Reading
  • Divine Immutability and the Doctrines of Grace (pt. 1)

    from John MacArthur May 04, 2009 Category: Articles

    The Bible repeatedly and unapologetically underscores the fact that God does not change. In fact, He cannot change because He cannot improve on absolute perfection or decline in His eternally fixed nature. His person does not change: "'For I the Lord do not change'" (Mal. 3:6). His plans do not change: "The counsel of the Lord stands forever, the plans of his heart to all generations" (Ps. 33:11). His purpose does not change: "So when God desired to show more convincingly . . . the unchangeable character of his purpose, he guaranteed it with an oath" (Heb. 6:17). God does not change His mind: "'The Glory of Israel will not lie or have regret, for he is not a man, that he should have regret'" (1 Sam. 15:29); or His words: "The Holy One of Israel . . . does not call back his words" (Isa. 31:1-2); or His calling: "The gifts and the calling of God are irrevocable" (Rom. 11:29; cf. Heb. 13:8; James 1:17). There are absolutely no changes in God, no variations, and no surprises (cf. Ps. 102:27). Keep Reading
  • Serving Christ in a Time of Plague

    from Greg Bailey May 03, 2009 Category: Articles

    News reports in recent days have brought word of an outbreak of swine flu in Mexico and around the world, raising fears of a "pandemic." For those of us who live in the West, where health care and good nutrition are taken for granted, a plague is a thing virtually unknown. Of course, it was not so for our forefathers in the faith. How did they react in the face of mass outbreaks of disease? Keep Reading
  • Top 5 Commentaries on the Book of Zephaniah

    from Keith Mathison May 02, 2009 Category: Articles

    The book of the prophet Zephaniah indicates that he ministered during the reign of Josiah (640-609), the last of the godly kings of Judah (cf. Zeph. 1:1). There are a number of helpful commentaries on the Book of Zephaniah, and the following are five of the best. Keep Reading
  • Has Science Buried God?

    from Keith Mathison May 01, 2009 Category: Articles

    One of the most common ways of looking at the relationship between science and faith is the conflict thesis, which posits an inherent conflict between science and religion. The conflict thesis was popularized in the nineteenth century by John William Draper and by Andrew Dickson White. Despite the acknowledged poor scholarship underlying these works, the conflict thesis has persisted among both believers and unbelievers. Today, some scientists, including Peter Atkins, Daniel Dennett, and Richard Dawkins, are asserting that there should no longer be any conflict because science has shown us either that God does not exist or that God almost certainly does not exist. Keep Reading

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