Ligonier Blog / Thursday / July 28 / 2016

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  • Enlightened Self-Interest

    from Nathan W. Bingham Mar 20, 2012 Category: Articles

    The last Saturday in October is perhaps my favorite day of the year. The Southwest Virginia church I served for more than a dozen years has a grand celebration every year on that day. The people celebrate the grace of God in bringing us the Reformation, which began October 31, 1517, when Martin Luther nailed his Ninety-Five Theses on the church door in Wittenberg. The celebration includes a telling of the story of Martin Luther to the children around a bonfire with s'mores. (I told the story when we lived there.) It includes contests in cooking chili and in cooking pies. It includes a grand street fair, with fresh fried doughnuts, barbeque, and hot french fries. All Ninety-Five of the theses are recited. Children and adults sing and play their instruments. And as the day draws to a close, the people dance. They dance with each other. They dance before the watching world. Most of all, they dance for the pleasure of our King and Redeemer. It's a wonderful day, celebrating a glorious gospel. Keep Reading
  • Love God? Sometimes I Hate Him

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Mar 10, 2012 Category: Articles

    So Luther responded when queried about his love for God. He was honest enough to admit that while God is altogether lovely, Luther was a sinner, and his response to God showed it. We can have a love/hate relationship with that which matters to us for one of two reasons, or a combination thereof. In Luther's case God doesn't change, but Luther does. Sometimes, however, the object of our love changes while we don't. Sometimes that which we love behaves in an unlovely way, and our love flees. Still worse, sometimes that which we loved changes so radically that love is difficult if not impossible. Keep Reading
  • Why Are Gas Prices So High?

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Mar 03, 2012 Category: Articles

    There are ultimately only two ways by which prices are determined, by market forces of supply and demand, or by government forces imposing themselves in markets. When the nation experiences the pain of rapid price increases it does not take long for people to grow angry at the oil companies. They become the scapegoat. Those slightly more sophisticated may give the oil companies a pass, but blame oil speculators, or futures traders. Neither, however, are to blame. Keep Reading

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